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Ratification of the 1992 Climate Change Convention: What Determines Legislative Delay?

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  • Fredriksson, Per G
  • Gaston, Noel

Abstract

The authors use a proportional hazards framework to investigate the impact of various country characteristics on the duration of time taken to ratify the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The most significant findings are that the conditional probability of ratification is positively related to total CO2 emissions and the presence of civil liberties. The finding for emissions indicates that large, polluting countries were under great political pressure to ratify the FCCC. The latter finding is consistent with earlier research that found that democratic freedoms raised the probability of signing the Montreal Protocol. Copyright 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Fredriksson, Per G & Gaston, Noel, 2000. "Ratification of the 1992 Climate Change Convention: What Determines Legislative Delay?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 104(3-4), pages 345-368, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:104:y:2000:i:3-4:p:345-68
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    Cited by:

    1. Kimiko Terai, 2012. "Financial Mechanism and Enforceability of International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 53(2), pages 297-308, October.
    2. Tobias Böhmelt & Carola Betzold, 2013. "The impact of environmental interest groups in international negotiations: Do ENGOs induce stronger environmental commitments?," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 127-151, May.
    3. Antoine Cazals & Alexandre Sauquet, 2015. "How do elections affect international cooperation? Evidence from environmental treaty participation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 263-285, March.
    4. Alexandre Sauquet, 2014. "Exploring the nature of inter-country interactions in the process of ratifying international environmental agreements: the case of the Kyoto Protocol," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 141-158, April.
    5. Fankhauser, Sam & Gennaioli, Caterina & Collins, Murray, 2015. "The political economy of passing climate change legislation: evidence from a survey," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 63352, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Eliste, Paavo & Fredriksson, Per G., 2002. "Environmental Regulations, Transfers, and Trade: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 234-250, March.
    7. Alexandre SAUQUET & Antoine CAZALS, 2013. "When does cooperation win and why? Political cycles and participation in international environmental agreements," Working Papers 201320, CERDI.
    8. Morath, Florian, 2010. "Strategic information acquisition and the mitigation of global warming," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 206-217, March.
    9. Alexandre SAUQUET, 2011. "Exploring the Nature of Strategic Interactions in the Ratification Process of the Kyoto Protocol," Working Papers 201119, CERDI.
    10. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Gunther Markwardt, 2012. "Pollution, Economic Development and Democracy: Evidence from the MENA countries," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201227, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    11. Fredriksson, Per G. & Neumayer, Eric, 2013. "Democracy and climate change policies: Is history important?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 11-19.
    12. Stefanie Bailer & Florian Weiler, 2015. "A political economy of positions in climate change negotiations: Economic, structural, domestic, and strategic explanations," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 43-66, March.
    13. Bernauer, Thomas & Kalbhenn, Anna & Koubi, Vally & Ruoff, Gabi, 2010. "On commitment levels and compliance mechanisms: Determinants of participation in global environmental agreements," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 94, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    14. repec:got:cegedp:94 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:spr:ieaple:v:17:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10784-016-9332-y is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Gabriele Spilker & Vally Koubi, 2016. "The effects of treaty legality and domestic institutional hurdles on environmental treaty ratification," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 223-238, April.
    17. Yoshiki Yamagata & Jue Yang & Joseph Galaskiewicz, 2013. "A contingency theory of policy innovation: how different theories explain the ratification of the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 251-270, September.

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