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Moral Hazard in Insurance Claiming: Evidence from Automobile Insurance

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  • Cummins, J David
  • Tennyson, Sharon

Abstract

This article provides new evidence on moral hazard in insurance markets by analyzing the frequency of automobile bodily injury liability (BIL) claims. We conduct cross-sectional regressions of statewide BIL claims frequency rates on variables representing state economic, demographic, and legal characteristics that affect the marginal costs and benefits of filing claims. As an indicator of moral hazard, we use survey data on consumer attitudes toward various types of dishonest behavior relating to insurance claims. The results provide strong support for the hypothesis that attitudes toward dishonest behavior are related to BIL claims frequency, and thus provide evidence of significant moral hazard in automobile insurance markets. Copyright 1996 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Cummins, J David & Tennyson, Sharon, 1996. "Moral Hazard in Insurance Claiming: Evidence from Automobile Insurance," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 29-50, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:12:y:1996:i:1:p:29-50
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard A. Derrig & Sharon Tennyson, 2011. "The Impact of Rate Regulation on Claims: Evidence From Massachusetts Automobile Insurance," Risk Management and Insurance Review, American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 14(2), pages 173-199, September.
    2. Hyojoung Kim & Doyoung Kim & Subin Im & James W. Hardin, 2009. "Evidence of Asymmetric Information in the Automobile Insurance Market: Dichotomous Versus Multinomial Measurement of Insurance Coverage," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(2), pages 343-366.
    3. Dionne, Georges & Gagne, Robert, 2002. "Replacement Cost Endorsement and Opportunistic Fraud in Automobile Insurance," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 213-230, May.
    4. Sharon Tennyson, 2007. "Efficiency Consequences of Rate Regulation in Insurance Markets," NFI Policy Briefs 2007-PB-03, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    5. Cohen Alma, 2006. "The Disadvantages of Aggregate Deductibles," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-28, April.
    6. Helen I. Doerpinghaus & Joan T. Schmit & Jason Jia-Hsing Yeh, 2008. "Age and Gender Effects on Auto Liability Insurance Payouts," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 75(3), pages 527-550.
    7. Lammers, Frauke & Schiller, Jörg, 2010. "Contract design and insurance fraud: An experimental investigation," FZID Discussion Papers 19-2010, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    8. repec:bla:jrinsu:v:84:y:2017:i:1:p:7-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Bixter, Michael T. & Luhmann, Christian C., 2014. "Shared losses reduce sensitivity to risk: A laboratory study of moral hazard," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 63-73.
    10. Nathalie Etchart-Vincent, 2009. "Probability weighting and the ‘level’ and ‘spacing’ of outcomes: An experimental study over losses," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 45-63, August.
    11. Dana A. Kerr & Yu-Luen Ma & Joan T. Schmit, 2009. "A Cross-National Study of Government Social Insurance as an Alternative to Tort Liability Compensation," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(2), pages 367-384.
    12. M. Martin Boyer, 2000. "Centralizing Insurance Fraud Investigation*," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 25(2), pages 159-178, December.
    13. Chu-Shiu Li & Chwen-Chi Liu & Sheng-Chang Peng, 2013. "Expiration Dates in Automobile Insurance Contracts: The Curious Case of Last Policy Month Claims in Taiwan," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 38(1), pages 23-47, March.
    14. Cummins, J David & Phillips, Richard D & Weiss, Mary A, 2001. "The Incentive Effects of No-Fault Automobile Insurance," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 427-464, October.
    15. Robert E. Hoyt & David B. Mustard & Lars S. Powell, 2005. "The Effectiveness of Insurance Fraud Statutues: Evidence from Automobile Insurance," Risk and Insurance 0501001, EconWPA.
    16. Georges Dionne, 2012. "The Empirical Measure of Information Problems with Emphasis on Insurance Fraud and Dynamic Data," Cahiers de recherche 1233, CIRPEE.
    17. Artis, Manuel & Ayuso, Mercedes & Guillen, Montserrat, 1999. "Modelling different types of automobile insurance fraud behaviour in the Spanish market," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 67-81, March.
    18. Sjur Didrik Flåm & Elmar G. Wolfstetter, 2015. "Liability Insurance and Choice of Cars: A Large Game Approach," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(6), pages 943-963, December.
    19. Øyvind Kvalnes, 2011. "Blurred Promises: Ethical Consequences of Fine Print Policies in Insurance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 103(1), pages 77-86, April.
    20. repec:eee:pubeco:v:151:y:2017:i:c:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Chong, Alberto & Restrepo, Pascual, 2017. "Regulatory protective measures and risky behavior: Evidence from ice hockey," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 1-11.
    22. Mark J. Browne & Ellen S. Pryor & Bob Puelz, 2004. "The Effect of Bad-Faith Laws on First-Party Insurance Claims Decisions," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 355-390, June.
    23. Mary A. Weiss & Sharon Tennyson & Laureen Regan, 2010. "The Effects of Regulated Premium Subsidies on Insurance Costs: An Empirical Analysis of Automobile Insurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 77(3), pages 597-624.

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