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The Role of the Namayande in Iran's Textile Industry


  • Iwasaki, Yoko


The Iranian textile industry still remains important as one of the largest sources of employment within the non-petroleum sector, although it no longer plays the large role it used in the country's economy (having been replaced by petroleum as the economy's primary industry).The subject of this study are middlemen known as namayande in the Iranian textile industry who plays a very important role in the operations of the innumerable small and medium-sized private firms. When private firms import materials from abroad, namayande make the connections between them and foreign sellers. These middlemen are not local sales agents of foreign companies as is usually the case; rather the namayande specialize in purchasing goods for local buyers.This study will point out some of the reasons why the namayande exist, and examine the present state of Iran's textile industry along with the particular management problems found within the firms' operations.

Suggested Citation

  • Iwasaki, Yoko, 1998. "The Role of the Namayande in Iran's Textile Industry," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO), vol. 36(4), pages 440-458, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:deveco:v:36:y:1998:i:4:p:440-458

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shah Mehmood WAGAN, 2015. "Export boost of textile industry of Pakistan by availing EU’s GSP Plus," Journal of Economics Library, KSP Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 18-27, March.

    More about this item


    Namayande; Textile industry; Industrial management; Iran; 繊維産業; 企業経営; イラン;

    JEL classification:

    • L67 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Other Consumer Nondurables: Clothing, Textiles, Shoes, and Leather Goods; Household Goods; Sports Equipment


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