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Conspiratorial Reasoning And Economics


  • Madalina CALANCE

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania)

  • Paula-Elena DIACON

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania)

  • Andreea-Nicoleta DONICI

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania)


The unintelligibility of the social and economic phenomena is due to isolation from the various backgrounds that has driven and maintained them. The conspiratorial reasoning insists over those backgrounds and focuses on identifying the intentionality in the primary cause. Throughout history, global economic relations have been ordered by private goals, which often subordinated to the desire for wealth or power; the market and the natural order had been oppressed by the state interventionism and by the will of some political powerful groups. In this context, we believe that the conspiratorial reasoning can be an instrument of the economic analysis, by pointing the specific political and economic interests that rule over the apparent hazard of interests. This paper aims to illustrate the peculiarities of the conspiratorial reasoning, as an alternative, beneficial reasoning, which can guide us to the answers we need in a world of paradoxes and coincidences.

Suggested Citation

  • Madalina CALANCE & Paula-Elena DIACON & Andreea-Nicoleta DONICI, 2014. "Conspiratorial Reasoning And Economics," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 6(4), pages 29-42, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2014:v:6:i:4:p:29-42

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ian Manners, 2002. "Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 235-258, June.
    2. Meunier, Sophie, 2000. "What Single Voice? European Institutions and EU–U.S. Trade Negotiations," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(01), pages 103-135, December.
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    More about this item


    Conspiracy theory; Conspiratorial reasoning; Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B49 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Other
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification


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