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Equilibrium Selection via Adaptation: Using Genetic Programming to Model Learning in a Coordination Game

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  • Shu-Heng Chen, John Duffy, Chia-Hsuan Yeh

Abstract

This paper models adaptive learning behavior in a simple coordination game that Van Huyck, Cook and Battalio (1994) have investigated in a controlled laboratory setting with human subjects. We consider how populations of artificially intelligent players behave when playing the same game. We use the genetic programming paradigm, as developed by Koza (1992, 1994), to model how a population of players might learn over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Shu-Heng Chen, John Duffy, Chia-Hsuan Yeh, . "Equilibrium Selection via Adaptation: Using Genetic Programming to Model Learning in a Coordination Game," The Electronic Journal of Evolutionary Modeling and Economic Dynamics, IFReDE - Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  • Handle: RePEc:jem:ejemed:1002
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Duffy, John, 2006. "Agent-Based Models and Human Subject Experiments," Handbook of Computational Economics,in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 19, pages 949-1011 Elsevier.
    2. Andreas Ortmann & Sergey Slobodyan & Samuel S. Nordberg, 2003. "(The Evolution of) Post-Secondary Education: A Computational Model and Experiments," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp208, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    3. Ernan Haruvy & M. Utku Ünver, 2003. "Equilibrium Selection in Repeated Business-to-Business Matching Markets," Experimental 0305004, EconWPA, revised 03 Dec 2004.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Adaptation; Genetic Programming; Coordination Game; Equilibrium Selection; Survival of the Fittest;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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