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Socionic Multi-Agent Systems Based on Reflexive Petri Nets and Theories of Social Self-Organisation



This contribution summarises the core results of the transdisciplinary ASKO project, part of the German DFG's programme Sozionik, which combines sociologists' and computer scientists' skills in order to create improved theories and models of artificial societies. Our research group has (a) formulated a social theory, which is able to explain fundamental mechanisms of self-organisation in both natural and artificial societies, (b) modelled this in a mathematical way using a visual formalism, and (c) developed a novel multi-agent system architecture which is conceptually coherent, recursively structured (hence non-eclectic) and based on our social theory. The article presents an outline of both a sociological middle-range theory of social self-organisation in educational institutions, its formal, Petri net based model, including a simulation of one of its main mechanisms, and the multi-agent system architecture SONAR. It describes how the theory was created by a re-analysis of some grand social theories, by grounding it empirically, and finally how the theory was evaluated by modelling its concepts and statements.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Köhler & Roman Langer & Rolf von Lüde & Daniel Moldt & Heiko Rölke & Rüdiger Valk, 2007. "Socionic Multi-Agent Systems Based on Reflexive Petri Nets and Theories of Social Self-Organisation," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 10(1), pages 1-3.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2006-14-3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David Joyce & John Kennison & Owen Densmore & Stephen Guerin & Shawn Barr & Eric Charles & Nicholas S. Thompson, 2006. "My Way or the Highway: a More Naturalistic Model of Altruism Tested in an Iterative Prisoners' Dilemma," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 9(2), pages 1-4.
    2. Isaac, R Mark & Walker, James M, 1988. "Communication and Free-Riding Behavior: The Voluntary Contribution Mechanism," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(4), pages 585-608, October.
    3. Ahn, T K & Ostrom, Elinor & Walker, James M, 2003. "Heterogeneous Preferences and Collective Action," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(3-4), pages 295-314, December.
    4. Seinen, Ingrid & Schram, Arthur, 2006. "Social status and group norms: Indirect reciprocity in a repeated helping experiment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 581-602, April.
    5. M.A. Nowak & K. Sigmund, 1998. "Evolution of Indirect Reciprocity by Image Scoring/ The Dynamics of Indirect Reciprocity," Working Papers ir98040, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    6. Rabin, Matthew, 1993. "Incorporating Fairness into Game Theory and Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1281-1302, December.
    7. Berg Joyce & Dickhaut John & McCabe Kevin, 1995. "Trust, Reciprocity, and Social History," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 122-142, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:comaot:v:23:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10588-016-9224-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. David Anzola & Peter Barbrook-Johnson & Juan I. Cano, 0. "Self-organization and social science," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-37.


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