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From Classroom Experiments to Computer Code




A carefully designed experimental procedure may be an invaluable source for gathering empirical data and a key to grasping the heterogeneity of human behavior, which is of the utmost importance when modeling artificial agents. This paper proposes an alternative way of inferring models of behavior through a different use of data gathered in classroom experiments. By way of example, we report and then discuss the results and the computer code obtained from the analysis of the behavior of subjects in two classroom experiments.

Suggested Citation

  • Arianna Dal Forno & Ugo Merlone, 2004. "From Classroom Experiments to Computer Code," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 7(3), pages 1-2.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2003-40-3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brusco, Sebastiano, 1982. "The Emilian Model: Productive Decentralisation and Social Integration," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 167-184, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ugo Merlone & Daren Sandbank & Ferenc Szidarovszky, 2013. "Equilibria analysis in social dilemma games with Skinnerian agents," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 12(2), pages 219-233, November.
    2. Riccardo Boero & Flaminio Squazzoni, 2005. "Does Empirical Embeddedness Matter? Methodological Issues on Agent-Based Models for Analytical Social Science," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 8(4), pages 1-6.
    3. Arianna Dal Forno & Ugo Merlone, 2014. "Leaders emergence in artificial populations: the role of networks," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1853-1865, July.


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