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  • Stelian Alexandru BORZ

    () (Transilvania University of Brasov)

  • Gheorghe IGNEA

    (Transilvania University of Brasov)

  • Ilie OPREA

    (Transilvania University of Brasov)

  • Valentina CIOBANU

    (Transilvania University of Brasov)

  • Florin DINULICA

    (Transilvania University of Brasov)


The reduction in Green House Gas (GHG) emissions is a challenge to today’s industries (as it is stated by the Kyoto Protocol) as a prerequisite of sustainable development and environment protection. Usually, the last ones are regarded as complementary strategies in attaining the overall goal. Timber harvesting represents one of the most technical components of the overall timber production. In most cases it is achieved by using heavy machinery which is deployed in the mature stands to be harvested. The participation level of the machinery, trends to increase in the case of stands from which the primary production results. Due to the increased densities of the stands (in thinning),frequently animal means are used for timber logging, which can be associated with increased capacity mechanized means. This paper presents an evaluation of production efficiency, fuel consumptions, costs and carbon emissions using comparisons between animal logging and mechanized logging means. As resulted from the study, the utilization of animal logging is less efficient from the production and cost point of view but it is cleaner (no carbon emissions). Data presented in this paper may provide the necessary tools for developing policies related to timber harvesting and carbon emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Stelian Alexandru BORZ & Gheorghe IGNEA & Ilie OPREA & Valentina CIOBANU & Florin DINULICA, 2013. "A COMPARISON IN TERMS OF CARBON EMISSION, COST AND PRODUCTIVITY OF THE MOST USED TECHNOLOGIES IN THE YOUNG THINNED STANDS – The CASE OF ROMANIA," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 36(1(45)), pages 136-148, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ine:journl:v:2:y:2013:i:44:p:136-148

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    animal logging; thinning; evaluation; efficiency; carbon emissions;

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry


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