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Community Membership Aspirations: The Link Between Inequality And Redistribution Revisited


  • Alain Desdoigts
  • Fabien Moizeau


This article studies how distributional tensions can act in many different ways depending on the social affinity between the different economic classes and their prospect of upward or downward mobility. We consider that socioeconomic group membership through its implied social interactions and peer effects is an important determinant of an individual's outcome. Agents, while voting on a social contract, take into account the consequences of their choice over their ex post belonging to a particular community. Thus, the endogenous sorting of the population into clusters may lead to a nonmonotonic relationship between inequality and the pressure for redistributive policies. Copyright 2005 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Alain Desdoigts & Fabien Moizeau, 2005. "Community Membership Aspirations: The Link Between Inequality And Redistribution Revisited," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 973-1007, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:46:y:2005:i:3:p:973-1007

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gilles Le Garrec, 2014. "Fairness, socialization and the cultural deman for redistribution," Sciences Po publications 2014-20, Sciences Po.
    2. Roland Bénabou & Jean Tirole, 2006. "Belief in a Just World and Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 699-746.
    3. Gilles Le Garrec, 2014. "Fairness, socialization and the cultural deman for redistribution," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2014-20, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. repec:spr:sochwe:v:50:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00355-017-1080-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mireya Bermeo Álvarez, 2013. "La economía política del tamaño del Estado," REVISTA CIFE, UNIVERSIDAD SANTO TOMÁS, June.

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