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Some Results on Comparative Statics under Uncertainty


  • Cheng, Hsueh-Cheng
  • Magill, Michael J P
  • Shafer, Wayne J


This paper presents results on comparative statics for a class of decision problems under uncertainty. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived for parameter changes and stochastically dominant shifts in the return in the two-asset portfolio problem. These results give conditions for the demand for money to be inversely related to the rate of interest. Further applications include the qualitive behavior of aggregate savings under uncertainty and the production decision of a firm facing price uncertainty. Copyright 1987 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheng, Hsueh-Cheng & Magill, Michael J P & Shafer, Wayne J, 1987. "Some Results on Comparative Statics under Uncertainty," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 28(2), pages 493-507, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:28:y:1987:i:2:p:493-507

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Quiggin, John, 1982. "A theory of anticipated utility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 323-343, December.
    2. K. R. W. Brewer, 1963. "Decisions Under Uncertainty: Comment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 159-161.
    3. Uzi Segal, 1984. "Nonlinear Decision Weights with the Independence Axiom," UCLA Economics Working Papers 353, UCLA Department of Economics.
    4. Roger Sherman, 1974. "The Psychological Difference Between Ambiguity and Risk," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 88(1), pages 166-169.
    5. Schoemaker, Paul J H, 1982. "The Expected Utility Model: Its Variants, Purposes, Evidence and Limitations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 529-563, June.
    6. Robert A. Jones & Joseph M. Ostroy, 1984. "Flexibility and Uncertainty," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(1), pages 13-32.
    7. Machina, Mark J, 1982. ""Expected Utility" Analysis without the Independence Axiom," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(2), pages 277-323, March.
    8. Mossin, Jan, 1969. "A Note on Uncertainty and Preferences in a Temporal Context," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 172-174, March.
    9. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    10. Schmeidler, David, 1989. "Subjective Probability and Expected Utility without Additivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(3), pages 571-587, May.
    11. Vernon L. Smith, 1969. "Measuring Nonmonetary Utilities in Uncertain Choices: The Ellsberg Urn," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(2), pages 324-329.
    12. Rothschild, Michael & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 1970. "Increasing risk: I. A definition," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 225-243, September.
    13. Hogarth, Robin M & Kunreuther, Howard, 1989. "Risk, Ambiguity, and Insurance," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 5-35, April.
    14. repec:bla:joares:v:9:y:1971:i:2:p:307-332 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Kreps, David M & Porteus, Evan L, 1978. "Temporal Resolution of Uncertainty and Dynamic Choice Theory," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 185-200, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Eichner & Andreas Wagener, 2002. "Increases in Risk and the Welfare State," CESifo Working Paper Series 685, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Wagener, Andreas, 2004. "On intergenerational risk sharing within social security schemes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 181-206, March.
    3. Thomas Eichner & Andreas Wagener, 2005. "Notes and Comments: Measures of risk attitude: correspondences between mean-variance and expected-utility approaches," Decisions in Economics and Finance, Springer;Associazione per la Matematica, vol. 28(1), pages 53-65, June.
    4. Chuang, O-Chia & Eeckhoudt, Louis & Huang, Rachel J. & Tzeng, Larry Y., 2013. "Risky targets and effort," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 465-468.
    5. Eeckhoudt, Louis & Etner, Johanna & Schroyen, Fred, 2009. "The values of relative risk aversion and prudence: A context-free interpretation," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 1-7, July.
    6. W. Chiu & Louis Eeckhoudt & Beatrice Rey, 2012. "On relative and partial risk attitudes: theory and implications," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 50(1), pages 151-167, May.
    7. Christian Gollier & James Hammitt & Nicolas Treich, 2013. "Risk and choice: A research saga," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 129-145, October.
    8. Horowitz, I. & Thompson, P., 1995. "The sophisticated decision maker: All work and no pay?," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 1-11, February.
    9. Hennessy, David A., 1993. "Applications of contingent claims theory to microeconomic problems," ISU General Staff Papers 1993010108000011822, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    10. repec:zbw:ifweej:20181 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Donald Meyer & Jack Meyer, 2005. "Relative Risk Aversion: What Do We Know?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 243-262, December.
    12. Gelles, Gregory M. & Mitchell, Douglas W., 2002. "Increasingly mean-seeking utility functions and n-asset portfolios," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 911-919.
    13. Gollier Christian & Schlee Edward E, 2006. "Increased Risk-Bearing with Background Risk," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-29, March.
    14. Gao, Jianwei & Zhao, Feng, 2017. "Sufficient conditions of stochastic dominance for general transformations and its application in option strategy," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-40, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    15. Sunanda Roy, 2000. "Risk Sharing through Labor Contracts - Risk Aversion, Market Incompleteness and Employment," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1767, Econometric Society.

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