IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ids/ijpubp/v4y2009i6p533-548.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

'Involuntary self-employment' in Finland: a bleak future?

Author

Listed:
  • Teemu Kautonen
  • Jenni Palmroos
  • Pekka Vainio

Abstract

'Involuntary self-employment' has recently received considerable political and media attention in Finland. The notion of involuntary self-employment has been used to refer to situations where an employer seeks increased flexibility and cost efficiency by 'pushing' former employees into new forms of precarious self-employment. Although the terminology used varies, the phenomenon itself is known across Europe. However, little empirical evidence exists as to the characteristics and scope of involuntary self-employment. This paper addresses this research gap by defining five characteristics of involuntary self-employment and, based on these, analysing survey data from 850 Finnish small firms to explore its scope. The results show that the phenomenon is marginal in relation to the Finnish small business population as a whole. Hence, it seems to exist at most in certain sectoral niches that are small enough to remain 'hidden' in broad cross-sectoral samplings.

Suggested Citation

  • Teemu Kautonen & Jenni Palmroos & Pekka Vainio, 2009. "'Involuntary self-employment' in Finland: a bleak future?," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(6), pages 533-548.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:ijpubp:v:4:y:2009:i:6:p:533-548
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.inderscience.com/link.php?id=25261
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Laaser, Claus-Friedrich & Schrader, Klaus, 1992. "Zur Reintegration der baltischen Staaten in die Weltwirtschaft," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 1526, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Niles Hansen, 1991. "Factories in Danish Fields: How High-Wage, Flexible Production has Succeeded in Peripheral Jutland," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 14(2), pages 109-132, August.
    3. Dani Rodrik, 2000. "How Far Will International Economic Integration Go?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 177-186, Winter.
    4. Gunther Tichy, 1998. "Geography lost and found in economics," ERSA conference papers ersa98p23, European Regional Science Association.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ids:ijpubp:v:4:y:2009:i:6:p:533-548. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darren Simpson). General contact details of provider: http://www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalID=97 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.