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The Rise and Fall of Cross-Country Growth Regressions

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  • Steven N. Durlauf

Abstract

This paper discusses the history of the use of cross-country regressions in modern growth economics. These regressions continue to be the workhorse of empirical growth analysis even though their meaning continues to be controversial. I argue that the early interpretations of these regressions have proven to be inappropriate and led to substantial exaggeration of the evidentiary support for various new growth theories. On the other hand, I argue that these regressions have a valuable role to play in identifying the modern analog of stylized facts for growth behavior.

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  • Steven N. Durlauf, 2009. "The Rise and Fall of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 41(5), pages 315-333, Supplemen.
  • Handle: RePEc:hop:hopeec:v:41:y:2009:i:5:p:315-333
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    2. Tesfaselassie, Mewael F., 2016. "The impact of disembodied technological progress on working hours," Kiel Working Papers 2026, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Glawe, Linda & Wagner, Helmut, 2016. "China in the Middle-Income Trap?," MPRA Paper 73336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Bretschger, Lucas, 2015. "Energy prices, growth, and the channels in between: Theory and evidence," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 29-52.
    5. Michele Battisti & Massimo Del Gatto & Christopher F. Parmeter, 2014. "Labor Productivity Growth: Disentangling Technology and Capital Accumulation," Working Papers 2014-02, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    6. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:39:y:2017:i:4:p:680-698 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Battisti, Michele & Di Vaio, Gianfranco & Zeira, Joseph, 2013. "Global Divergence in Growth Regressions," CEPR Discussion Papers 9687, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Gomes, Nicolas Dias & Cerqueira, Pedro André & Almeida, Luís Alçada, 2015. "A survey on software piracy empirical literature: Stylized facts and theory," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 29-37.
    9. Amini, Shahram & Battisti, Michele & Parmeter, Christopher F., 2017. "Decomposing changes in the conditional variance of GDP over time," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 376-387.
    10. Vu, Khuong M., 2013. "Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Singapore’s economic growth," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 284-300.

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