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Polymer Recovery from Auto Shredder Residue by Projectile Separation Method

Author

Listed:
  • Jason J. S. Lee

    () (School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Victoria 3083, Australia)

  • John P. T. Mo

    () (School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Victoria 3083, Australia)

  • Dong Yang Wu

    () (Melbourne Technology Centre, Boeing Research & Technology Australia, The Boeing Company, Victoria 3207, Australia)

Abstract

The number of vehicles on the road has been increasing at an enormous rate over the last decade. By 2015, the number of vehicles that reach the end of their life will be close to a million per year in Australia. Most metallic parts of the vehicle can be recycled but the plastic components and components of other materials are normally shredded and disposed in landfills. As more vehicles are using composite materials, the percentage of materials sent to landfill is alarming. This paper reviews existing polymer recycling techniques for End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) and proposes a more efficient electrostatic based projectile separation method. The test rig is at the preliminary stage of development and initial outcomes are promising.

Suggested Citation

  • Jason J. S. Lee & John P. T. Mo & Dong Yang Wu, 2012. "Polymer Recovery from Auto Shredder Residue by Projectile Separation Method," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-13, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:4:p:643-655:d:17217
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Keith Pezzoli, 1997. "Sustainable Development: A Transdisciplinary Overview of the Literature," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 549-574.
    2. York, Richard & Rosa, Eugene A. & Dietz, Thomas, 2003. "STIRPAT, IPAT and ImPACT: analytic tools for unpacking the driving forces of environmental impacts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 351-365, October.
    3. Kitzes, Justin & Galli, Alessandro & Bagliani, Marco & Barrett, John & Dige, Gorm & Ede, Sharon & Erb, Karlheinz & Giljum, Stefan & Haberl, Helmut & Hails, Chris & Jolia-Ferrier, Laurent & Jungwirth, , 2009. "A research agenda for improving national Ecological Footprint accounts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1991-2007, May.
    4. Peter Nijkamp & Emilia Rossi & Gabriella Vindigni, 2004. "Ecological Footprints in Plural: A Meta-analytic Comparison of Empirical Results," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(7), pages 747-765.
    5. Gallopín, Gilberto C., 2003. "A systems approach to sustainability and sustainable development," Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo 64, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Auto Shredder Residue; End-of-Life Vehicles; recycling; manufacturing;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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