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Chicago workshop on black–white inequality: a summary

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  • Derek Neal

Abstract

The Chicago Workshop on Black–White Inequality, funded by the Searle Freedom Trust, meets on a semiannual basis to explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality between blacks and whites in the U.S. On December 15, 2006, the second meeting of the workshop was hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

Suggested Citation

  • Derek Neal, 2007. "Chicago workshop on black–white inequality: a summary," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Apr.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhle:y:2007:i:apr:n:237a
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    File URL: http://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/chicago_fed_letter/2007/cflapril2007_237a.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Education - Economic aspects;

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