IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedfel/y2012iapr2n2012-10.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why has wage growth stayed strong?

Author

Listed:
  • Mary C. Daly
  • Bart Hobijn
  • Brian Lucking

Abstract

Despite a severe recession and modest recovery, real wage growth has stayed relatively solid. A key reason seems to be downward nominal wage rigidities, that is, the tendency of employers to avoid cutting the dollar value of wages. This phenomenon means that, in nominal terms, wages tend not to adjust downward when economic conditions are poor. With inflation relatively low in recent years, these rigidities have limited reductions in the real wages of a large fraction of U.S. workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Mary C. Daly & Bart Hobijn & Brian Lucking, 2012. "Why has wage growth stayed strong?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue apr2.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2012:i:apr2:n:2012-10
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2012/el2012-10.html
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2012/el2012-10.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mary C. Daly & Bart Hobijn, 2014. "Downward Nominal Wage Rigidities Bend the Phillips Curve," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(S2), pages 51-93, October.
    2. Monras, Joan, 2015. "Economic Shocks and Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 8840, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Craighead, William D. & Tien, Pao-Lin, 2015. "Nominal shocks and real exchange rates: Evidence from two centuries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 135-157.
    4. Michael W. Elsby & Donggyun Shin & Gary Solon, 2013. "Wage Adjustment in the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 19478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Aedín Doris & Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2015. "Wage flexibility and the great recession: the response of the Irish labour market," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    6. Aruoba, S. Borağan & Bocola, Luigi & Schorfheide, Frank, 2017. "Assessing DSGE model nonlinearities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 34-54.
    7. Jordan Roulleau-Pasdeloup, 2016. "The Government Spending Multiplier in a Deep Recession," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 16.22, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    8. Mees, Heleen & Franses, Philip Hans, 2014. "Are individuals in China prone to money illusion?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 38-46.
    9. repec:eee:labeco:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:67-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Luis Diéz-Catalán & Ernesto Villanueva, 2015. "Contract staggering and unemployment during the great recession: evidence from Spain," Working Papers 1431, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    11. Fallick, Bruce C. & Lettau, Michael & Wascher, William L., 2016. "Downward Nominal Wage Rigidity in the United States during and after the Great Recession," Working Paper 1602, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    12. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Dmitri Koustas, 2013. "Amerisclerosis? The Puzzle of Rising U.S. Unemployment Persistence," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 44(2 (Fall)), pages 193-260.
    13. Stefano, Fasani, 2016. "Long-run Unemployment and Macroeconomic Volatility," Working Papers 352, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 18 Oct 2016.
    14. Egorov D.A. & Perevyshina E.A., 2016. "Modelling of Inflationary Processes in Russia," Working Papers 2138, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    15. Bazhal, Iurii, 2015. "Impact of Wage Policy on Economic Growth in Transitive Countries and New Interpretation of the Phillips Curve," MPRA Paper 67106, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Oct 2015.
    16. Balázs Reizer, 2015. "Do Firms Pay Bonuses to Protect Jobs?," CEU Working Papers 2015_6, Department of Economics, Central European University.
    17. Wix, Carlo, 2017. "The long-run real effects of banking crises: Firm-level investment dynamics and the role of wage rigidity," SAFE Working Paper Series 189, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    18. Balazs Reizer, 2016. "Do Firms Pay Bonuses to Protect Jobs?," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1612, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    19. Sachiko Kuroda & Isamu Yamamoto, 2014. "Is Downward Wage Flexibility the Primary Factor of Japan's Prolonged Deflation?," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 9(1), pages 143-158, January.
    20. Biswas, Siddhartha & Hanson, Andrew & Phan, Toan, 2018. "Bubbly Recessions," Working Paper 18-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    21. Pierre Fortin, 2013. "The Macroeconomics of Downward Nominal Wage Rigidity : a Review of the Issues and New Evidence for Canada," Cahiers de recherche 1309, CIRPEE.
    22. Filippo Gori, 2016. "Disentangling the Monetary Policy Stance," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 27, Bank of Lithuania.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wages;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2012:i:apr2:n:2012-10. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Research Library). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbsfus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.