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Public policies and private pension contributions


  • William G. Gale


Changes in pension regulation since 1974 have coincided with changes in pension coverage, plan choice, funding status, and pension contributions. This paper examines the effects of regulation and other factors on these items. The main contribution is a new set of estimates of the determinants of pension contributions. Regressions using a new, comprehensive measure of private pension contributions indicate that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act raised contributions and the 1987 full funding limitations reduced contributions. In each case, the regulatory change accounts for a sizable share of the actual change in contributions. Copyright 1994 by Ohio State University Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • William G. Gale, 1994. "Public policies and private pension contributions," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 710-734.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcpr:y:1994:p:710-734

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marvin Goodfriend & Monica Hargraves, 1983. "A historical assessment of the rationales and functions of reserve requirements," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Mar, pages 3-21.
    2. Maurice Obstfeld, 1988. "The Effectiveness of Foreign-Exchange Intervention: Recent Experience," NBER Working Papers 2796, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 2004. "Social security, pensions and retirement behaviour within the family," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 723-737.
    2. Thomas Davidoff & Jeffrey R. Brown & Peter A. Diamond, 2005. "Annuities and Individual Welfare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1573-1590, December.
    3. Charles Brown, 2006. "The Role of Conventional Retirement Age in Retirement Decisions," Working Papers wp120, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    4. A Lusardi & J Skinner & S Venti, 2001. "Saving puzzles and saving policies in the United States," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 95-115, Spring.
    5. Bertrand Wigniolle & Philippe Michel & Pascal Belan, 2002. "Pension funds and capital accumulation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(1), pages 1-8.
    6. Joseph G. Haubrich & James B. Thomson, 1994. "A conference on federal credit allocation," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q III, pages 2-13.
    7. Belan, Pascal & Michel, Philippe & Wigniolle, Bertrand, 2003. "Les effets à long terme des fonds de pension," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 79(4), pages 457-480, Décembre.
    8. Annamaria Lusardi, 2003. "The Impact of Financial Education on Savings and Asset," Working Papers wp061, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Andrew Au & Olivia S. Mitchell & John W.R. Phillips, 2005. "Saving Shortfalls and Delayed Retirement," Working Papers wp094, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    10. Jeffrey B. Liebman & Erzo F. P. Luttmer, 2012. "The Perception of Social Security Incentives for Labor Supply and Retirement: The Median Voter Knows More Than You'd Think," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(1), pages 1-42.
    11. Babb James, 2014. "The politics of small business organization, partisanship and institutionalization: similarities in the contrasting cases of Japan and the US," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-30, April.
    12. Jeffrey R. Brown, 2007. "Rational and Behavioral Perspectives on the Role of Annuities in Retirement Planning," NBER Working Papers 13537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Cory Koedel & Jason A. Grissom & Shawn Ni & Michael Podgursky, 2011. "Pension-Induced Rigidities in the Labor Market for School Leaders," Working Papers 1115, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    14. Kanika Kapur & Jeannette Rogowski, 2006. "Love or Money? Health Insurance and Retirement Among Married Couples," NBER Working Papers 12273, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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