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The regional impact of health care reform - with a focus on New England

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  • Jane Sneddon Little
  • Michael D. Jud

Abstract

The United States has begun the huge task of reforming its health care system and many individuals have already begun to consider the likely impact of health care reform on their state's economy. Given the momentum of change in the private sector and at the state level, the U.S. health care system will never be the same again, with or without federal legislation. Because New England is the U.S. region most dependent on employment in health care services, concerns about the impact of health care reform are particularly acute in this area. ; Accordingly, this article presents a preliminary analysis of the regional impact of health care reform. The country's concerns seem clear enough and its financing options~ are limited enough to permit examining the regional impact of reform using the Clinton Administration's Health Security Act as an illustrative example. The study concludes that reform under the Health Security Act or any other viable plan could lead to a not insignificant shift of economic resources and activity away from most New England states, in large part because this generally highincome region will help fund improved access and subsidized premium payments in other parts of the country. Nonetheless, within the decade, health reform will provide net savings within the region and the nation. Recognizing the redistributional challenges in store, New England leaders and taxpayers must seek to use their share of these savings in ways that promote the economic vitality of the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Jane Sneddon Little & Michael D. Jud, 1994. "The regional impact of health care reform - with a focus on New England," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jul, pages 3-32.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1994:i:jul:p:3-32
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    File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neer/neer1994/neer494a.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laurence Ball, 1994. "What Determines the Sacrifice Ratio?," NBER Chapters,in: Monetary Policy, pages 155-193 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    3. Barro, Robert J & Gordon, David B, 1983. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural Rate Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 589-610, August.
    4. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1990. "Gross Job Creation and Destruction: Microeconomic Evidence and Macroeconomic Implications," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1990, Volume 5, pages 123-186 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Caballero, Ricardo J & Hammour, Mohamad L, 1994. "The Cleansing Effect of Recessions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1350-1368, December.
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    Keywords

    Medical care ; New England;

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