IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Structural booms: why the South grows

  • Thomas J. Cunningham

Since the end of the 1991 recession, almost 27 percent of all new jobs in the United States have been created in the six southeastern states that make up the Sixth Federal Reserve District. What accounts for this strong relative economic performance in the region? ; This article examines the forces behind the South's economic strength and looks ahead at the course of its economic development in terms of three alternative approaches--the industrial base, the convergence, and the structuralist models. In evaluating the models' usefulness for thinking about why regions grow, the author finds the structuralist approach, which provides a general equilibrium model for understanding capital flows, interest rates, assets, goods, and labor market behavior, to hold the most promise as a perspective on long-term trends because it addresses the root causes of differential growth rates. This approach suggests a number of reasons for the Southeast's relatively rapid recent growth, which, taken together, give evidence of economic and social structures that may attract both employers and employees to the region at a disproportionate rate for some time to come.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its journal Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (1995)
Issue (Month): May ()
Pages: 1-10

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:fip:fedaer:y:1995:i:may:p:1-10:n:v.80no.3
Contact details of provider: Postal:
1000 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309

Phone: 404-521-8500
Web page: http://www.frbatlanta.org/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

Order Information: Email:


No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedaer:y:1995:i:may:p:1-10:n:v.80no.3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Meredith Rector)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.