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Determinants of Foreign Currency Borrowing in the New Member States of the EU



The paper empirically investigates the determinants of foreign currency borrowing by the private sector in the new member states of the European Union. The authors find that striking differences in patterns of foreign currency borrowing between countries are explained by the extent to which domestic banks finance credit expansion from abroad, the level of deposit dollarization, and the interest rate differential. Joining the EU appears to have played an important role, by providing direct access to foreign funding, offering hedging opportunities through greater trade openness, lending credibility to exchange rate regimes, and raising expectations of imminent euro adoption. The empirical evidence suggests that regulatory policies to slow foreign currency borrowing have had only limited success.

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  • Christoph Rosenberg & Marcel Tirpák, 2009. "Determinants of Foreign Currency Borrowing in the New Member States of the EU," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(3), pages 216-228, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:59:y:2009:i:3:p:216-228

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kátay, Gábor & Péter, Harasztosi, 2017. "Currency Matching and Carry Trade by Non-Financial Corporations," Working Papers 2017-02, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
    2. Dzsamila Vonnak, 2015. "Decomposing the Riskiness of Corporate Foreign Currency Lending: the Case of Hungary," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1528, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    3. Afees Salisu & Idris Ademuyiwa & Basiru Fatai, 2013. "Modelling the Demand for Money in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 635-647.
    4. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Jarko Fidrmuc & Mariya Hake, 2011. "Determinants of Foreign Currency Loans in CESEE Countries: A Meta-Analysis," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 4, pages 69-87.
    5. Malgorzata Skibinska, 2017. "Transmission of monetary policy and exchange rate shocks under foreign currency lending," Working Papers 2017-027, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis.
    6. Brzoza-Brzezina, Michał & Kolasa, Marcin & Makarski, Krzysztof, 2017. "Monetary and macroprudential policy with foreign currency loans," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PB), pages 352-372.
    7. Elisabeth Beckmann, 2017. "How does foreign currency debt relief affect households’ loan demand? Evidence from the OeNB Euro Survey in CESEE," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 8-32.
    8. Juan Carlos Cuestas & Fabio Filipozzi & Karsten Staehr, 2015. "Uncovered Interest Parity in Central and Eastern Europe: Sample, Expectations and Structural Breaks," Working Papers 2015014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    9. Judit Temesvary, 2016. "The drivers of foreign currency-based banking in Central and Eastern Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 24(2), pages 233-257, April.
    10. Fidrmuc, Jarko & Hake, Mariya & Stix, Helmut, 2013. "Households’ foreign currency borrowing in Central and Eastern Europe," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1880-1897.
    11. Horváth, Roman & Komárek, Luboš & Rozsypal, Filip, 2011. "Does money help predict inflation? An empirical assessment for Central Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 523-536.
    12. Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús & Fidrmuc, Jarko & Hake, Mariya, 2014. "Demand and supply drivers of foreign currency loans in CEECs: A meta-analysis," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 26-42.
    13. Romain Rancière & Aaron Tornell & Athanasio Vamvakidis, 2010. "Currency Mismatch and Systemic Risk in Emerging Europe," PSE - G-MOND WORKING PAPERS halshs-00967419, HAL.
    14. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:4:p:695-710 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Herman Kamil, 2012. "How Do Exchange Rate Regimes Affect Firms' Incentives to Hedge Currency Risk? Micro Evidence for Latin America," IMF Working Papers 12/69, International Monetary Fund.
    16. Juan Carlos Cuestas & Fabio Filipozzi & Karsten Staehr, 2017. "Uncovered interest parity in Central and Eastern Europe: Expectations and structural breaks," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(4), pages 695-710, September.
    17. Beckmann, Elisabeth & Stix, Helmut, 2015. "Foreign currency borrowing and knowledge about exchange rate risk," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-16.
    18. repec:onb:oenbwp:y::i:171:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Steven Ongena & Ibolya Schindele & Dzsamila Vonnak, 2014. "In Lands of Foreign Currency Credit, Bank Lending Channels Run Through? The Effects of Monetary Policy at Home and Abroad on the Currency Denomination of the Supply of Credit," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1424, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    20. Ostry, Jonathan D. & Ghosh, Atish R. & Chamon, Marcos & Qureshi, Mahvash S., 2012. "Tools for managing financial-stability risks from capital inflows," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 407-421.
    21. Vitor Constancio, 2011. "Challenges to European Economic Integration," Chapters,in: Post-Crisis Growth and Integration in Europe, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    22. Steven Ongena & Ibolya Schindele & Dzsamila Vonnák, 2017. "In Lands of Foreign Currency Credit, Bank Lending Channels Run Through?," MNB Working Papers 2017/6, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).

    More about this item


    foreign currency borrowing; new EU member states; Central and Eastern Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages


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