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Tail Behavior of the Central European Stock Markets during the Financial Crisis


  • Jozef Baruník
  • Lukáš Vácha
  • Miloslav Vošvrda


In the paper we research statistical properties of the Central European stock markets. We focus mainly on the tail behavior of the Czech, Polish, and Hungarian stock markets and compare them to the benchmark U.S. and German stock markets. We fit the data of the 4-year period from March 2005 to March 2009 with the stable probability distribution model and discuss its tail behavior. As the estimation of the tail exponent is very sensitive to the size of the data set, the estimates can be misleading for short daily samples. Thus, we employ high-frequency 1-minute data, which proves to be a good choice as it reveals interesting findings about the distributional properties. Furthermore, we study the difference in stock market behavior before and during the financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jozef Baruník & Lukáš Vácha & Miloslav Vošvrda, 2010. "Tail Behavior of the Central European Stock Markets during the Financial Crisis," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 4(3), pages 281-294, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2010_281

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Financial crisis; tail behavior; stock markets; stable probability distribution;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C16 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Econometric and Statistical Methods; Specific Distributions


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