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Disabilità, benessere e ruolo dello Stato


  • Giuseppe Clerico


Disability conditions can be considered as functional restrictions. From an economic point of view disability causes both poverty and inequality. Disability causes additional cost of turning family income into individual welfare. From a social point of view disability is a source of discrimination. Ceteris paribus disability needs a higher income to reach the same welfare level. The State could contrast social discrimination against the disabled. The State has the power to intervene through monetary subsidies, earmarked subsidies, and in kind service supply. The State aims both at ameliorating the life quality of the disabled and at influencing the disabled expenditure pattern positively. The State faces both information asimmetry and control difficulty in terms of the nature and level of individual disability assessment. In presence of adverse selection disability causes moral hazard. The public disability protection needs resources raised through tax. The public redistribution is justified as the disabled has a higher marginal consumption utility, especially when the disabled is a poor one. Hence, the social welfare maximization needs a public activity so to minimize the distortion effects of tax raising.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Clerico, 2009. "Disabilità, benessere e ruolo dello Stato," ECONOMIA PUBBLICA, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 0(3-4), pages 5-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:fan:epepep:v:html10.3280/ep2009-003001

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Roberto Perotti, 2012. "The "Austerity Myth": Gain without Pain?," NBER Chapters,in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 307-354 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Roberto Perotti, 2012. "The Effects of Tax Shocks on Output: Not So Large, but Not Small Either," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 214-237, May.
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    4. Thushyanthan Baskaran & Lars P. Feld & Jan Schnellenbach, 2014. "Fiscal Federalism, Decentralization and Economic Growth: Survey and Meta-Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 4985, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Dixit Avinash K, 2010. "Democracy, Autocracy and Bureaucracy," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-47, January.
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    7. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 763-801, June.
    8. Roberto Perotti, 2011. "The "Austerity Myth": Gain without Pain?," Working Papers 430, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    9. Perotti, Roberto, 2011. "The "Austerity Myth": Gain without Pain?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8658, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Timothy Besley, 2007. "The New Political Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(524), pages 570-587, November.
    11. Roberto Perotti, 2011. "The "Austerity myth": Gain Without Pain?," BIS Working Papers 362, Bank for International Settlements.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being


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