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Wildlife Gardening and Connectedness to Nature: Engaging the Unengaged

Author

Listed:
  • Amy Shaw
  • Kelly Miller
  • Geoff Westcott

Abstract

An often overlooked impact of urbanisation is a reduction in our ability to connect with nature in our daily lives. If people lose the ability to connect with nature we run the risk of creating a nature-disconnect, which is hypothesised to have an impact on our empathy for other species and our desire to help conservation efforts. Understanding how a sense of connection with nature can impact upon people's decisions to seek out nature in their daily lives is important if we wish to encourage the practice of wildlife gardening as a tool to enhance both urban biodiversity and connectedness to nature. This study targeted members of wildlife gardening programmes (n=261) and members of the general public (n=417) and provides empirical evidence that connectedness to nature is a primitive belief, but also shows that a strong sense of connection with nature is not a prerequisite for engaging in wildlife gardening.

Suggested Citation

  • Amy Shaw & Kelly Miller & Geoff Westcott, 2013. "Wildlife Gardening and Connectedness to Nature: Engaging the Unengaged," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 22(4), pages 483-502, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:env:journl:ev22:ev2222
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Henry Kaiser, 1970. "A second generation little jiffy," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 35(4), pages 401-415, December.
    2. Henry Kaiser, 1974. "An index of factorial simplicity," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 39(1), pages 31-36, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Connectedness to nature; wildlife gardening; urban conservation; urban wildlife; biodiversity conservation;

    JEL classification:

    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources

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