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Endogenous corruption in economic development

Author

Listed:
  • Keith Blackburn
  • Niloy Bose
  • M. Emranul Haque

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of the joint determination of bureaucratic corruption and economic development. Design/methodology/approach - The analysis is based on a simple model of growth in which bureaucrats are employed as agents of the government to collect taxes from households. Findings - Corruption is reflected in bribery and tax evasion as bureaucrats conspire with households in providing false information to the government. Costly concealment of this activity leads to a loss of resources available for productive investments. The incentive for a bureaucrat to accept a bribe depends on economy-wide outcomes, which, in turn, depend on the number of other bureaucrats who accept bribes. The paper establishes the existence of multiple development regimes, together with the possibility of both history- and frequency-dependent equilibria. The predictions of the analysis accord strongly with recent empirical evidence. Originality/value - The paper provides insights into the issue, and in doing so, makes further inroads to the macroeconomics of misgovernance.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith Blackburn & Niloy Bose & M. Emranul Haque, 2010. "Endogenous corruption in economic development," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(1), pages 4-25, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:37:y:2010:i:1:p:4-25
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Djumashev, Ratbek, 2006. "Corrupt Bureaucracy and Growth," MPRA Paper 2082, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. David Croix & Clara Delavallade, 2009. "Growth, public investment and corruption with failing institutions," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 187-219, July.
    3. Axel Dreher & Lars-H.R. Siemers, 2003. "The Intriguing Nexus Between Corruption and Capital Account Restrictions," Development and Comp Systems 0306004, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Jul 2005.
    4. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2010. "Financial liberalization, bureaucratic corruption and economic development," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1321-1339, November.
    5. Houqe, Muhammad Nurul & Monem, Reza M., 2016. "IFRS Adoption, Extent of Disclosure, and Perceived Corruption: A Cross-Country Study," The International Journal of Accounting, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 363-378.
    6. Roy Cerqueti & Raffaella Coppier & Gustavo Piga, 2012. "Corruption, growth and ethnic fractionalization: a theoretical model," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 106(2), pages 153-181, June.
    7. Suwastika Naidu & Anand Chand, 2014. "Exploring the relationship between freedom from corruption and business governance in the Oceania region," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(6), pages 3489-3509, November.
    8. Ali T. Akarca & Aysit Tansel, 2016. "Voter reaction to government incompetence and corruption related to the 1999 earthquakes in Turkey," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(2), pages 309-335, May.
    9. David de la Croix & Axel Gosseries, 2007. "Procreation, Migration and Tradable Quotas," Chapters,in: Population Aging, Intergenerational Transfers and the Macroeconomy, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Amrita Dillon & GARETH D. MYLES & HANA YOUSEFI, 2015. "Corruption and Seigniorage," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(4), pages 480-503, August.
    11. Ramirez, Carlos D., 2014. "Is corruption in China “out of control”? A comparison with the US in historical perspective," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 76-91.
    12. King Yoong Lim, 2017. "The Dynamics of Corruption and Unemployment in a Growth Model with Heterogeneous Labour," Working Papers 198144263, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    13. M. Emranul Haque & Richard Kneller, 2015. "Why does Public Investment Fail to Raise Economic Growth? The Role of Corruption," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(6), pages 623-651, December.
    14. Humna Ahsan & Keith Blackburn, 2015. "Human capital and income distribution in a model of corruption," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 208, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    15. Edward Nissan & Shahdad Naghshpour, 2013. "Connecting corruption to ethnic polarization and religious fractionalization," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 763 - 774, November.
    16. Bose, Niloy & Capasso, Salvatore & Murshid, Antu Panini, 2008. "Threshold Effects of Corruption: Theory and Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1173-1191, July.
    17. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1466-3 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Corruption; Bribery; Economic development;

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