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Other Things Equal: Notre Dame Loses


  • Deirdre N. McCloskey

    () (University of Illinois at Chicago
    Erasmus University Rotterdam
    Denison University)


Academic economics in the United States has a scientific range all the way from M to N. This is not because the Samuelsonian mainstream is such a smashing scientific success, unless you count numbers of Samuelsonian articles certified by Samuelsonian professors in Samuelsonian journals as "success." Real insight into the economy does not come from existence theorems buttressed by statistical significance, that is, the cargo-cult method of the Samuelsonians (if you can stand another attempt by me to get these points across see The Secret Sins of Economics). Insight comes from the dwindling number of individual economists and sometimes whole departments of economics (fortunately the political scientists, sociologists, and policy mavens are taking up the slack) who think, as the present Department of Economics at Notre Dame does (wait a while), that economics is the study of the economy and is a part of the conversation of humankind

Suggested Citation

  • Deirdre N. McCloskey, 2003. "Other Things Equal: Notre Dame Loses," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 309-315, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:29:y:2003:i:2:p:309-315

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C. Hall, 2017. "A "Model" Model: McCloskey and the Craft of Economics," Working Papers 17-09, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. J. Barkley Rosser Jr & Richard P.F. Holt & David Colander, 2010. "European Economics at a Crossroads," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13585.
    3. Barbara Dluhosch, 2011. "European Economics at a Crossroads, by J. Barkley Rosser, Jr., Richard P. F. Holt, and David Colander," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 629-631, August.

    More about this item


    Economics; Journals;

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics


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