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The role of attribute processing strategies in estimating the preferences of road freight stakeholders

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  • Puckett, Sean M.
  • Hensher, David A.

Abstract

Choice behaviour studies typically assume passive bounded rationality, suggesting that decision makers process all information given to them with equal attention. However, it is probable that decision makers invoke any number of attribute processing strategies (APSs) when weighing the characteristics of candidate alternatives against one another. Utilising data from a study of urban road freight stakeholders evaluating alternative packages of component trip times, fuel costs and variable user charges, this paper shows that accounting for APS heterogeneity associate with each alternative in each choice set results in differing marginal disutilities and willingness to pay for components of travel time, compared to a model which assumes passive bounded rationality.

Suggested Citation

  • Puckett, Sean M. & Hensher, David A., 2008. "The role of attribute processing strategies in estimating the preferences of road freight stakeholders," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 379-395, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transe:v:44:y:2008:i:3:p:379-395
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Masiero, Lorenzo & Hensher, David A., 2010. "Analyzing loss aversion and diminishing sensitivity in a freight transport stated choice experiment," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 349-358, June.
    2. Mohammed Alemu & Morten Mørkbak & Søren Olsen & Carsten Jensen, 2013. "Attending to the Reasons for Attribute Non-attendance in Choice Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(3), pages 333-359, March.
    3. Campbell, Danny & Hensher, David A. & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2012. "Cost thresholds, cut-offs and sensitivities in stated choice analysis: Identification and implications," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 396-411.
    4. Caputo, Vincenzina & Nayga, M. Rodolfo Jr. & Sacchi, Giovanna & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2016. "Attribute non-attendance or attribute-level non-attendance? A choice experiment application on extra virgin olive oil," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236035, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Ladenburg, Jacob & Olsen, Søren Bøye, 2014. "Augmenting short Cheap Talk scripts with a repeated Opt-Out Reminder in Choice Experiment surveys," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 39-63.
    6. Francesco P. Deflorio & Jesus Gonzalez-Feliu & Roberto Tadei & Simone Amico, 2009. "Service quality planning for freight distribution with time windows in large networks," Working Papers halshs-01056187, HAL.
    7. Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte, 2013. "Inferred vs. stated attribute non-attendance in choice experiments: A study of doctors’ prescription behaviour," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 21-31.
    8. repec:eee:transa:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:228-243 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Mesa-Arango, Rodrigo & Ukkusuri, Satish V., 2014. "Attributes driving the selection of trucking services and the quantification of the shipper’s willingness to pay," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 142-158.
    10. Kravchenko, Alex, 2014. "Influence of rudimentary attribute non-attendance (ANA) on choice experiment parameter estimates and design efficiency: A Monte Carlo Simulation analysis," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 11(C), pages 57-68.
    11. Ariane Kehlbacher & Kelvin Balcombe & Richard Bennett, 2013. "Stated Attribute Non-attendance in Successive Choice Experiments," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 693-706, September.
    12. Caputo, Vincenzina & Loo, Ellen J. Van & Scarpa, Riccardo & Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr & Verbeke, Wim, 2014. "“Using Experiments to Address Attribute Non-attendance in Consumer Food Choices”," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 177173, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Stephane Hess & David Hensher, 2013. "Making use of respondent reported processing information to understand attribute importance: a latent variable scaling approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 397-412, February.
    14. David Hensher & David Layton, 2010. "Parameter transfer of common-metric attributes in choice analysis: implications for willingness to pay," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 473-490, May.
    15. Fischer, Anke & Glenk, Klaus, 2011. "One model fits all? -- On the moderating role of emotional engagement and confusion in the elicitation of preferences for climate change adaptation policies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1178-1188, April.
    16. Stephane Hess & Amanda Stathopoulos & Danny Campbell & Vikki O’Neill & Sebastian Caussade, 2013. "It’s not that I don’t care, I just don’t care very much: confounding between attribute non-attendance and taste heterogeneity," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 583-607, May.
    17. Andrew Collins & John Rose & Stephane Hess, 2012. "Interactive stated choice surveys: a study of air travel behaviour," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 55-79, January.

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