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The effectiveness of fiscal feedback rules and automatic stabilizers under rational expectations

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  • McCallum, B. T.
  • Whitaker, J. K.

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  • McCallum, B. T. & Whitaker, J. K., 1979. "The effectiveness of fiscal feedback rules and automatic stabilizers under rational expectations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 171-186, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:5:y:1979:i:2:p:171-186
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    Cited by:

    1. Hwang, Chiun-Lin, 1989. "Optimal monetary policy in an open macroeconomic model with rational expectation," ISU General Staff Papers 1989010108000010197, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Darrel Cohen & Glenn Follette, 2000. "The automatic fiscal stabilizers: quietly doing their thing," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Apr, pages 35-67.
    3. Preston J. Miller, 1983. "Income stability and economic efficiency under alternative tax schemes," Staff Report 86, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. Olivier Jean Blanchard, 2000. "The automatic fiscal stabilizers: quietly doing their thing - commentary," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Apr, pages 69-74.
    5. Marston, Richard C. & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1985. "Macroeconomic stabilization through taxation and indexation: The use of firm-specific information," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 375-395, November.
    6. Matti Virén, 2005. "Government size and output volatility: is there a relationship?," Macroeconomics 0508025, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Pierre-Yves Hénin, 1997. "Soutenabilité des déficits et ajustements budgétaires," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 48(3), pages 371-395.
    8. Virén, Matti, 2005. "Government size and output volatility : is there a relationship?," Research Discussion Papers 8/2005, Bank of Finland.
    9. Clausen, Volker & Wohltmann, Hans-Werner, 2005. "Monetary and fiscal policy dynamics in an asymmetric monetary union," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 139-167, February.
    10. Buiter, Willem H & Eaton, Jonathan, 1980. "Policy Decentralisation and Exchange Rate Management in Interdependent Economies," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 172, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    11. Preston J. Miller & Arthur J. Rolnick, 1979. "The CBO's policy analysis: an unquestionable misuse of a questionable theory," Staff Report 49, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    12. Darrat, Ali F & Glascock, John L, 1993. "On the Real Estate Market Efficiency," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 55-72, July.
    13. Gabriel Di Bella, 2002. "The Significance of Federal Taxes as Automatic Stabilizers," IMF Working Papers 02/199, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Willem H. Buiter, 1981. "Granger-Causality and Stabilization Policy," NBER Technical Working Papers 0010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Daniels, Joseph P. & VanHoose, David D., 2009. "Openness, income-tax progressivity, and inflation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 485-491, September.
    16. John B. Taylor, 1983. "Rational Expectations Models in Macroeconomics," NBER Working Papers 1224, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Dotsey, Michael & King, Robert G., 1983. "Monetary instruments and policy rules in a rational expectations environment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 357-382, September.
    18. Walsh, Carl E, 1984. "Interest Rate Volatility and Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(2), pages 133-150, May.
    19. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Keynesian, Classical and New Keynesian Approaches to Fiscal Policy: Comparison and Critique," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(2), pages 179-204, April.
    20. J. Stephen Ferris, 1998. "Real government size, automatic feedback rules and the measured effectiveness of fiscal policy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 365-373.

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