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Deficits, government spending, and inflation : What is the evidence?

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  • Niskanen, William A.

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  • Niskanen, William A., 1978. "Deficits, government spending, and inflation : What is the evidence?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 591-602, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:4:y:1978:i:3:p:591-602
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sargent, Thomas J & Wallace, Neil, 1973. "The Stability of Models of Money and Growth with Perfect Foresight," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(6), pages 1043-1048, November.
    2. Sims, Christopher A, 1972. "Money, Income, and Causality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 540-552.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barro, Robert J, 1980. "Federal Deficit Policy and the Effects of Public Debt Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(4), pages 747-762, November.
    2. Luigi Spaventa, 2013. "The growth of public debt in Italy: past experience, perspectives and policy problems," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 66(266), pages 291-324.
    3. Katrin Wölfel & Christoph S. Weber, 2017. "Searching for the Fed’s reaction function," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 191-227.
    4. Arora, Harjit K. & Smyth, David J., 1995. "Presidential regimes and the federal reserve's accommodation of federal budget deficits," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 53-63.
    5. James Alm & Abel Embaye, 2010. "Explaining The Growth Of Government Spending In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(2), pages 152-169, June.
    6. Bharat R. Koluri & Demetrios S. Giannaros, 1987. "Deficit and External Debt Effects on Money and Inflation in Brazil and Mexico: Some Evidence," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 243-248, Jul-Sep.
    7. D.P. Doessel & Abbas Valadkhani, 2002. "Public Finance and The Size of Government: A Literature Review and Econometric Results for Fiji," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 108, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    8. Easaw, Joshy Z. & Garratt, Dean, 2006. "General elections and government expenditure cycles: Theory and evidence from the UK," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 292-306, June.
    9. Facchini, Francois, 2014. "The determinants of public spending: a survey in a methodological perspective," MPRA Paper 53006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Leroy Laney & Thomas Willett, 1983. "Presidential politics, budget deficits, and monetary policy in the United States; 1960–1976," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 53-69, January.
    11. Alan S. Blinder, 1982. "On the Monetization of Deficits," NBER Working Papers 1052, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Oseni Isiaq Olasunkanmi & Sanni Hauwa Yetunde, 2016. "Does Fiscal Deficit Granger Cause Impulsiveness in Inflation Rate in Nigeria?," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, pages 208-216.
    13. Hemantha K.J. Ekanayake, 2012. "The Link Between Fiscal Deficit and Inflation: Do public sector wages matter?," ASARC Working Papers 2012-14, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    14. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2009. "Do Tax Cuts Starve the Beast? The Effect of Tax Changes on Government Spending," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 139-214.
    15. Ghura, Dhaneshwar, 1995. "Effects of macroeconomic policies on income growth, inflation, and output growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 367-395, August.
    16. Amela HUBIC & Francisco DE CASTRO, "undated". "The Effects of Inflation on General Government Accounts," EcoMod2010 259600077, EcoMod.

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