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Learning in mis-specified models and the possibility of cycles


  • Nyarko, Yaw


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  • Nyarko, Yaw, 1991. "Learning in mis-specified models and the possibility of cycles," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 416-427, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:55:y:1991:i:2:p:416-427

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tapan Mitra & Henry Y. Wan, 1985. "Some Theoretical Results on the Economics of Forestry," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 263-282.
    2. Benhabib, Jess & Rustichini, Aldo, 1989. "A Vintage Capital Model Of Investment And Growth: Theory And Evidence," Working Papers 89-26, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    3. Mitra, Tapan & Wan, Henry Jr., 1986. "On the faustmann solution to the forest management problem," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 229-249, December.
    4. McKenzie, Lionel W., 1979. "Optimal Economic Growth and Turnpike Theorems," Working Papers 267, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schinkel, Maarten Pieter & Tuinstra, Jan & Vermeulen, Dries, 2002. "Convergence of Bayesian learning to general equilibrium in mis-specified models," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 483-508, December.
    2. Alvaro Sandroni, 1997. "Learning Rare Events," Discussion Papers 1199, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    3. Yann Braouezec, 2010. "Committee, Expert Advice, and the Weighted Majority Algorithm: An Application to the Pricing Decision of a Monopolist," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 35(3), pages 245-267, March.
    4. Naimzada, Ahmad & Ricchiuti, Giorgio, 2011. "Monopoly with local knowledge of demand function," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 299-307.
    5. Castro, Tomás del Barrio & Rodrigues, Paulo M.M. & Taylor, A.M. Robert, 2013. "The Impact Of Persistent Cycles On Zero Frequency Unit Root Tests," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(06), pages 1289-1313, December.
    6. Ennis, Huberto M. & Keister, Todd, 2005. "Government policy and the probability of coordination failures," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 939-973, May.
    7. Huberto M. Ennis & Todd Keister, 2001. "Optimal policy with probabilistic equilibrium selection," Working Paper 01-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    8. Maciej K. Dudek, 2004. "Expectation Formation and Endogenous Fluctuations in Aggregate Demand," Econometric Society 2004 Latin American Meetings 103, Econometric Society.
    9. Kalai, Ehud & Lehrer, Ehud, 1993. "Rational Learning Leads to Nash Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(5), pages 1019-1045, September.
    10. Ignacio Esponda & Demian Pouzo, 2014. "Berk-Nash Equilibrium: A Framework for Modeling Agents with Misspecified Models," Papers 1411.1152,, revised May 2016.
    11. Ignacio Esponda & Demian Pouzo, 2015. "Equilibrium in Misspecified Markov Decision Processes," Papers 1502.06901,, revised May 2016.
    12. Spiros Bougheas & Indraneel Dasgupta & Oliver Morrissey, 2007. "Tough love or unconditional charity?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 561-582, October.
    13. Sandroni, Alvaro, 1998. "Learning, Rare Events, and Recurrent Market Crashes in Frictionless Economies without Intrinsic Uncertainty," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-18, September.
    14. Stracca, Livio, 2004. "Behavioral finance and asset prices: Where do we stand?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 373-405, June.
    15. Peterson,G.D. & Carpenter,S.R. & Brock,W.A., 2002. "Uncertainty and the management of multi-state ecosystems : an apparently rational route to collapse," Working papers 10, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    16. Fudenberg, Drew & Romanyuk, Gleb & Strack, Philipp, 2017. "Active learning with a misspecified prior," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(3), September.
    17. Nyarko, Yaw & Olson, Lars J., 1996. "Optimal growth with unobservable resources and learning," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 465-491, May.

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