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Market Strategies for Climate Change

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  • Kolk, Ans
  • Pinkse, Jonatan

Abstract

The issue of climate change has attracted increasing business attention in the past decade. Whereas companies initially aimed primarily at influencing the policy debate, corporate strategies increasingly include economic responses. Existing classifications for climate change strategies however still reflect the political, non-market components. Using empirical information from the largest multinational companies worldwide, this article examines current market responses, focusing on the drivers (threats and opportunities) and the actions being taken by companies to address climate change. It also develops a typology of climate strategies that addresses the market dimensions, covering both the aim (strategic intent) and the degree of cooperation (form of organisation). The aim turns out to be either innovation or compensation, while the organisational arrangements to reach this objective can be oriented at the company level (internal), at companies' own supply chain (vertical) or at cooperation with other companies (competitors or companies in other sectors -- horizontal). The typology can assist managers in deciding about the strategic option(s) they want to choose regarding climate change, also based on the insights offered by the paper about the current state of activities of other companies worldwide.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolk, Ans & Pinkse, Jonatan, 2004. "Market Strategies for Climate Change," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 304-314, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eurman:v:22:y:2004:i:3:p:304-314
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    Cited by:

    1. Hockerts, Kai & Wüstenhagen, Rolf, 2010. "Greening Goliaths versus emerging Davids -- Theorizing about the role of incumbents and new entrants in sustainable entrepreneurship," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 481-492, September.
    2. Busch, Timo & Hoffmann, Volker H., 2007. "Emerging carbon constraints for corporate risk management," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(3-4), pages 518-528, May.
    3. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:21:y:2017:i:03:n:s1363919617500281 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Darmani, Anna & Arvidsson, Niklas & Hidalgo, Antonio & Albors, Jose., 2014. "What drives the development of renewable energy technologies? Toward a typology for the systemic drivers," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 834-847.
    5. Kruger, Joseph, 2005. "From SO2 to Greenhouse Gases: Trends and Events Shaping Future Emissions Trading Programs in the United States," Discussion Papers dp-05-20, Resources For the Future.
    6. Chonnikarn Fern Jira & Michael W. Toffel, 2011. "Engaging Supply Chains in Climate Change," Harvard Business School Working Papers 12-026, Harvard Business School, revised Oct 2012.
    7. Markus J. Milne & Suzana Grubnic, 2011. "Climate change accounting research: keeping it interesting and different," Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 24(8), pages 948-977, October.
    8. repec:eee:transe:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:60-82 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Matisoff, Daniel C., 2013. "Different rays of sunlight: Understanding information disclosure and carbon transparency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 579-592.
    10. Chia-Wei Hsu & Tsai-Chi Kuo & Guey-Shin Shyu & Pi-Shen Chen, 2014. "Low Carbon Supplier Selection in the Hotel Industry," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(5), pages 1-27, May.
    11. Jon Skjærseth, 2013. "Governance by EU emissions trading: resistance or innovation in the oil industry?," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 31-48, March.
    12. Jeremy Galbreath, 2011. "To What Extent is Business Responding to Climate Change? Evidence from a Global Wine Producer," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 104(3), pages 421-432, December.
    13. Derek Wang, 2017. "A Comparative Study of Firm-Level Climate Change Mitigation Targets in the European Union and the United States," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(4), pages 1-19, March.
    14. Shamima Haque & Craig Deegan, 2010. "Corporate Climate Change-Related Governance Practices and Related Disclosures: Evidence from Australia," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 20(4), pages 317-333, December.
    15. Numan-Parsons, Elisabeth & Stroombergen, Adolf Stroombergen & Fletcher, Ngaio, 2011. "Business Responses to the Introduction of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme: Part I," Occasional Papers 11/4, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    16. Jabbour, Charbel José Chiappetta & Neto, Angelo Saturnino & Gobbo, José Alcides & Ribeiro, Maisa de Souza & Jabbour, Ana Beatriz Lopes de Sousa, 2015. "“Eco-innovations in more sustainable supply chains for a low-carbon economy: A multiple case study of human critical success factors in Brazilian leading companies”," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 245-257.
    17. Sandoff, Anders & Schaad, Gabriela, 2009. "Does EU ETS lead to emission reductions through trade? The case of the Swedish emissions trading sector participants," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3967-3977, October.
    18. Daniel Matisoff, 2015. "Sources of specification errors in the assessment of voluntary environmental programs: understanding program impacts," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 48(1), pages 109-126, March.
    19. Prasenjit Banerjee & Jason F. Shogren, 2013. "Climate Change: Risk, Reputation, and Mechanism Design," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1303, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    20. Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten, 2009. "Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs from Emerging Economies," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 241-255, March.
    21. Theißen, Sebastian & Spinler, Stefan, 2014. "Strategic analysis of manufacturer-supplier partnerships: An ANP model for collaborative CO2 reduction management," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 233(2), pages 383-397.

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