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Causality and comovement between taxes and expenditures: Historical evidence from Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico

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  • Baffes, John
  • Shah, Anwar

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  • Baffes, John & Shah, Anwar, 1994. "Causality and comovement between taxes and expenditures: Historical evidence from Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 311-331, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:44:y:1994:i:2:p:311-331
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Phiri, 2018. "How sustainable are fiscal budgets in the Kingdom of Swaziland?," Working Papers 1810, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Mar 2018.
    2. G A Vamvoukas, 2011. "The Tax-Spend Debate with an Application to the EU," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 16(1), pages 65-88, March.
    3. Yuan-Hong Ho & Chiung-Ju Huang, 2009. "Tax-Spend, Spend-Tax, or Fiscal Synchronization: A Panel Analysis of the Chinese Provincial Real Data," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 5(2), pages 257-272, July.
    4. Yashobanta Parida, 2012. "Causal Link between Central Government Revenue and Expenditure: Evidence for India," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 2808-2816.
    5. Aka, F.B. & Decaluwe, B., 1999. "Causality and Comovement Between Tax Rate and Budget Deficits: Further Evidence from Developing Countries," Papers 9911, Laval - Recherche en Politique Economique.
    6. Qing Wang & Ugo Fasano-Filho, 2002. "Testing the Relationship Between Government Spending and Revenue; Evidence From GCC Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/201, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Paul Alagidede & George Tweneboah, 2015. "On the Sustainability and Synchronization of Fiscal Policy in Latin America," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 52(2), pages 213-240, November.
    8. Tsangyao Chang & WentRong Liu & Michael Thompson, 2002. "The Viability of Fiscal Policy in South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0209, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    9. Ghartey, Edward E., 2008. "The budgetary process and economic growth: Empirical evidence of the Jamaican economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1128-1136, November.
    10. Phiri, Andrew, 2016. "Asymmetries in the revenue-expenditure nexus: New evidence from South Africa," MPRA Paper 75224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Yaya Keho, 2010. "Spending Cuts or Tax Adjustments: How Can UEMOA Countries Control Their Budget Deficits?," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(3), pages 233-252, December.
    12. George A. Vamvoukas, 2011. "Panel Data Modeling and the Tax-Spend Controversy in the Euro Zone," Post-Print hal-00716629, HAL.
    13. Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2005. "The government revenue and government expenditure nexus: empirical evidence from nine Asian countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1203-1216, January.
    14. Tsangyao Chang & Yuan-Hong Ho, 2002. "A Note on Testing ¡°Tax-and-Spend, Spend-and-Tax or Fiscal Synchronization¡±: The Case of China," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 151-160, June.
    15. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan, 2006. "Government revenue and government expenditure nexus: evidence from developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 285-291.
    16. Baffes, John & Gohou, Gaston, 2005. "The co-movement between cotton and polyester prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3534, The World Bank.
    17. Schmidt, Torsten, 2001. "Finanzreformen in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland: Analyse der Veränderungen der Finanzverfassung von 1949 bis 1989," RWI Schriften, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, volume 67, number 67, April.
    18. GHARTEY, Edward E., 2010. "Government Expenditures And Revenues Causation: Some Caribbean Empirical Evidence," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(2).

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