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Profit-Related Pay: Prose Discovered


  • Blanchflower, David G
  • Oswald, Andrew J


This paper estimates that, in 1984, 43 percent of British private sector establishments had some form of profit- related pay. Regression results do not show that these establishments had statistically-significant better financial performance. Cross-ta bulations do not suggest that the establishments with income-sharing schemes had noticeably greater employment growth or better industrial relations. Copyright 1988 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew J, 1988. "Profit-Related Pay: Prose Discovered," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(392), pages 720-730, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:98:y:1988:i:392:p:720-30

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Feltenstein, Andrew & Lebow, David & van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 1990. "Savings, Commodity Market Rationing, and the Real Rate of Interest in China," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(2), pages 234-252, May.
    2. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    3. Aizenman, Joshua, 1989. "Monopolistic competition, relative prices, and output adjustment in the open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 5-28, March.
    4. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Asset Prices in an Exchange Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1429-1445, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. N Millward, 1993. "Uses of the Workplace Industrial Relations Surveys by British Labour Economists," CEP Discussion Papers dp0145, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Martin Conyon & Richard B. Freeman, 2004. "Shared Modes of Compensation and Firm Performance U.K. Evidence," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 109-146 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Yao, Shujie, 1997. "Profit Sharing, Bonus Payment, and Productivity: A Case Study of Chinese State-Owned Enterprises," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 281-296, June.
    4. Jääskelä, Jarkko, 1997. "Incomplete insurance market and its policy implication within European Monetary Union," Research Discussion Papers 8/1997, Bank of Finland.
    5. Kraft, Kornelius & Ugarkovic, Marija, 2006. "Profit sharing and the financial performance of firms: Evidence from Germany," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(3), pages 333-338, September.
    6. Fernandes, Ana & Ferreira, Priscila & Winters, L. Alan, 2014. "The Effect of Competition on Managers’ Compensation: Evidence From a Quasi-natural Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 10054, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Vicente Cuñat & Maria Guadalupe, 2005. "How Does Product Market Competition Shape Incentive Contracts?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(5), pages 1058-1082, September.
    8. Bryson, Alex & Freeman, Richard B., 2007. "Doing the right thing? does fair share capitalism improve workplace performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4964, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Felipe Balmaceda, "undated". "Compensation Methods in Competitive Labor Markets," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv118, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    10. Conyon, M. & Machin, S., 1989. "Profit Determination In U.K. Manufacturing," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 330, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    11. Leila Baghdadi & Rihab Bellakhal & Marc-Arthur Diaye, 2012. "Do French firms use financial participation to transfer more risk to their workers?," Documents de recherche 12-10, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    12. Stephen Drinkwater & Peter Ingram, 2005. "Have Industrial Relations in the UK Really Improved?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(2), pages 373-398, June.
    13. Dhillon, Amrita & Petrakis, Emmanuel, 2001. "Profit-sharing, bertrand competition and monopoly unions : a note," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 612, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    14. Millward, N., 1993. "Uses of the workplace industrial relations surveys by British labour economists," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20964, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Göddeke, Anna & Haucap, Justus & Herr, Annika & Wey, Christian, 2011. "Stabilität und Wandel von Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen aus wettbewerbsökonomischer Sicht," DICE Ordnungspolitische Perspektiven 10, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    16. Englmaier, Florian & Wambach, Achim, 2010. "Optimal incentive contracts under inequity aversion," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 312-328, July.
    17. Pablo González, 2002. "Profit Sharing Reconsidered: Efficiency Wages and Renegotiation Costs," Documentos de Trabajo 151, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    18. Chang, Juin-jen & Lai, Ching-chong & Lin, Chung-cheng, 2003. "Profit sharing, worker effort, and double-sided moral hazard in an efficiency wage model," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 75-93, March.

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