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Debt and Depression: Causal Links and Social Norm Effects

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  • John Gathergood

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  • John Gathergood, 2012. "Debt and Depression: Causal Links and Social Norm Effects," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(563), pages 1094-1114, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:122:y:2012:i:563:p:1094-1114
    DOI: j.1468-0297.2012.02519.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0297.2012.02519.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Montagnoli & Mirko Moro, 2014. "Everybody Hurts: Banking Crises and Individual Wellbeing," Working Papers 2014010, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    2. John Gathergood & Eleonora Fichera, "undated". "House Prices, Home Equity and Health," Discussion Papers 12/07, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.
    3. Daniel Hojman & Alvaro Miranda & Jaime Ruiz-Tagle, 2013. "Over Indebtedness and Depression: Sad Debt or Sad Debtors?," Working Papers wp385, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    4. Jenni Blomgren & Nico Maunula & Heikki Hiilamo, 2016. "Over-indebtedness and chronic disease: a linked register-based study of Finnish men and women during 1995–2010," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(5), pages 535-544, June.
    5. Lawrence M. Berger & J. Michael Collins & Laura Cuesta, 2016. "Household Debt and Adult Depressive Symptoms in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 42-57, March.
    6. Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "Wealth Effects, Local Area Attributes, and Economic Prospects: On the Relationship between House Prices and Mental Wellbeing," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 75-92, March.
    7. Shuying Shen & Abdoul G. Sam & Eugene Jones, 2014. "Credit Card Indebtedness and Psychological Well-Being Over Time: Empirical Evidence from a Household Survey," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 431-456, October.
    8. repec:wly:hlthec:v:25:y:2016:i::p:57-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Blázquez Cuesta, Maite & Budría, Santiago, 2015. "The Effects of Over-Indebtedness on Individual Health," IZA Discussion Papers 8912, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Vásquez-Vera, Hugo & Palència, Laia & Magna, Ingrid & Mena, Carlos & Neira, Jaime & Borrell, Carme, 2017. "The threat of home eviction and its effects on health through the equity lens: A systematic review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 199-208.
    11. Eleonora Fichera & John Gathergood, 2016. "Do Wealth Shocks Affect Health? New Evidence from the Housing Boom," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25, pages 57-69, November.
    12. Hojman, Daniel A. & Miranda, Álvaro & Ruiz-Tagle, Jaime, 2016. "Debt trajectories and mental health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 54-62.
    13. Brown, Martin & Henchoz, Caroline & Spycher, Thomas, 2017. "Culture and Financial Literacy," Working Papers on Finance 1703, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    14. John Gathergood, "undated". "Unemployment Expectations, Credit Commitments and Psychological Health," Discussion Papers 12/03, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    15. Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia & Mantovan, Noemi, 2017. "Will a Shrink Make you Richer? Gender Differences in the Effects of Psychotherapy on Labour Efficiency," MPRA Paper 81597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Bertazzi, Ilaria, 2014. "A challenge to normativity and economic theory, the case ofdebtors movements," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201405, University of Turin.
    17. Stefan Angel, 2016. "The Effect of Over-Indebtedness on Health: Comparative Analyses for Europe," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(2), pages 208-227, May.
    18. Clayton, Maya & Liñares-Zegarra, José & Wilson, John O.S., 2015. "Does debt affect health? Cross country evidence on the debt-health nexus," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 51-58.

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