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Financial Integration and Consumption Smoothing

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  • Tullio Jappelli
  • Luigi Pistaferri

Abstract

We present a new empirical strategy for testing if financial integration improves risk sharing opportunities and consumption smoothing. Our test is based on a decomposition of the variance of consumption growth into a component that depends on the variance of permanent income shocks and one that depends on the variance of transitory shocks. We then test if the process of financial market integration and liberalization brought about by the introduction of the euro has made consumption less sensitive to income shocks in Italy. The paper makes a significant contribution also from a methodological point of view. We use panel data on income to identify non parametrically a time series of the variances of the income shocks. We then rely on repeated cross-sections of consumption and income to identify the degree of smoothing with respect to income shocks, and test if it has declined after the introduction of the euro. Our procedure does not require that consumption and income are available in the same panel data. It can therefore be applied in all countries in which repeated cross-sectional consumption data can be combined with panel data on income.
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Suggested Citation

  • Tullio Jappelli & Luigi Pistaferri, 2011. "Financial Integration and Consumption Smoothing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(553), pages 678-706, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:121:y:2011:i:553:p:678-706
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    Cited by:

    1. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
    2. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Michael Donadelli & Alessia Varani, 2014. "International Capital Markets Structure, Preferences and Puzzles: The US-China Case," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1362, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Chiara Binelli & Orazio Attanasio, 2010. "Mexico in the 1990s: the Main Cross-Sectional Facts," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 238-264, January.
    4. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2016. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 130 Studies Say "Probably Not"," Working Papers 2016/08, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    5. Billio, M. & Donadelli, M. & Paradiso, A. & Riedel, M., 2017. "Which market integration measure?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 150-174.
    6. Monica Billio & Michael Donadelli & Antonio Paradiso & Max Riedel, 2015. "Measuring Financial Integration: Lessons from the Correlation," Working Papers 2015:23, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    7. Federica Teppa, 2014. "Consumption behaviour and financial crisis in the Netherlands," DNB Working Papers 453, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    8. Hryshko, Dmytro, 2014. "Correlated income shocks and excess smoothness of consumption," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 41-62.
    9. Tullio Jappelli & Luigi Pistaferri, 2010. "Does Consumption Inequality Track Income Inequality in Italy?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 133-153, January.
    10. Christian Friedrich, 2015. "Does Financial Integration Increase Welfare? Evidence from International Household-Level Data," Staff Working Papers 15-4, Bank of Canada.
    11. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Donadelli, Michael & Varani, Alessia, 2015. "International capital markets structure, preferences and puzzles: A “US–China World”," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 85-99.
    12. Donadelli, Michael & Paradiso, Antonio, 2014. "Does financial integration affect real exchange rate volatility and cross-country equity market returns correlation?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 206-220.
    13. Sung-Jin Kang & Robert Rudolf, 2016. "Rising Or Falling Inequality In Korea? Population Aging And Generational Trends," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-26, December.
    14. Philip R. Lane, 2008. "EMU and Financial Integration," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp272, IIIS.
    15. Almas Heshmati & Robert Rudolf, 2014. "Income versus Consumption Inequality in Korea: Evaluating Stochastic Dominance Rankings by Various Household Attributes," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 413-436, December.
    16. Asdrubali, Pierfederico & Tedeschi, Simone & Ventura, Luigi, 2015. "Household Risksharing Channels," MPRA Paper 65906, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Guillermo Larrain & Mariel Siravegna & Guillermo Yañez, 2009. "Intégration aux marchés financiers internationaux et lissage de la consommation : observations récentes en Amérique latine," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 95(2), pages 87-108.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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