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An Empirical Model of Collective Household Labour Supply with Non-Participation


  • HansG. Bloemen


I present a structural empirical model of collective household labour supply that includes the non-participation decision. I specify a simultaneous model for hours, participation and wages of husband and wife. I discuss the problems of identification and statistical coherency that arise in the application of the collective household labour supply model. The model includes random effects and it is estimated using a panel data set of Dutch couples. The estimates allow me to check the underlying regularity conditions on individual preferences and to obtain estimates of the sharing rule that governs the division of household income between husband and wife. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2009.

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  • HansG. Bloemen, 2010. "An Empirical Model of Collective Household Labour Supply with Non-Participation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(543), pages 183-214, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:120:y:2010:i:543:p:183-214

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hans Bloemen & Elena Stancanelli, 2007. "Modelling the employment and wage outcomes of spouses: is she outearning him?," Post-Print hal-01053593, HAL.
    2. Aaberge, Rolf & Colombino, Ugo & Perali, Federico, 2015. "A Centralized Approach to Modelling Collective Household Decisions: some preliminary results," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201505, University of Turin.
    3. Elena G. F. Stancanelli, 2006. "Les couples sur le marché de l'emploi. Une analyse exploratoire des années récentes," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 99(4), pages 235-272.
    4. repec:eme:ceapzz:s0573-855520140000293006 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. André Decoster & Peter Haan, 2015. "Empirical welfare analysis with preference heterogeneity," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 22(2), pages 224-251, April.
    6. Rana Hendy & Catherine Sofer, 2010. "A collective model of female labor supply: do distribution factors matter in the Egyptian case?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 10035, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    7. Olivier Donni & Nicolas Moreau, 2007. "Collective Labor Supply: A Single-Equation Model and Some Evidence from French Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    8. Olivier Donni & Eleonora Matteazzi, 2012. "On the Importance of Household Production in Collective Models: Evidence from U.S. Data," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 105-106, pages 99-125.
    9. Bloemen, Hans, 2010. "Income Taxation in an Empirical Collective Household Labour Supply Model with Discrete Hours," IZA Discussion Papers 4697, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Bernarda Zamora, 2011. "Does female participation affect the sharing rule?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(1), pages 47-83, January.
    11. Sisi Zhang, 2014. "Wage shocks, household labor supply, and income instability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 767-796, July.
    12. Hans Bloemen, 2015. "Collective Labour Supply, Taxes, and Intrahousehold Allocation: An Empirical Approach," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-121/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Hans Bloemen & Elena Stancanelli, 2015. "Toyboys or supergirls? An analysis of partners’ employment outcomes when she outearns him," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 501-530, September.
    14. Jaime Andres Sarmiento Espinel, 2012. "Children and non-participation in a model of collective household labor supply," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2012-14, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
    15. GholamReza Haddad, 2015. "Gender ratio, divorce rate, and intra-household collective decision process: evidence from iranian urban households labor supply with non-participation," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1365-1394, June.
    16. Chiappori, Pierre-André & Donni, Olivier, 2006. "Les modèles non unitaires de comportement du ménage : un survol de la littérature," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 82(1), pages 9-52, mars-juin.
    17. Jaime Andres Sarmiento Espinel & Edwin van Gameren, 2016. "A collective household labor supply model with children and non-participation: Theory and empirical application," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2016-11, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
    18. Olivier Donni & Eleonora Matteazzi, 2016. "Collective Decisions, Household Production, and the Labor Force Participation," THEMA Working Papers 2016-05, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    19. Hélène Couprie & Gaëlle Ferrant, 2015. "Welfare Comparisons, Economies of Scale and Equivalence Scale in Time Use," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 117-118, pages 185-210.
    20. Eleonora Matteazzi & Martina Menon & Federico Perali, 2017. "The Collective Farm-household Model: Policy and Welfare Simulations," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 111-153.
    21. Rolf Aaberge & Ugo Colombino, 2014. "Labour Supply Models," Contributions to Economic Analysis,in: Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling, volume 127, pages 167-221 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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