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The Degree and Determinants of Exchange Rate Pass-through: Market Structure, Non-tariff Barriers and Multinational Corporations


  • Menon, Jayant


This study investigates the exchange rate pass-through for Australian imports of manufactures. Pass-through elasticities are estimated for total manufactures and forty product categories by applying an econometric procedure which avoids the pitfalls in previous studies to a carefully assembled data set. The determinants of pass-through are analyzed by relating the pass-through elasticities to variables representing foreign control, nontariff barriers, product characteristics, and market structure. The author finds that pass-through is incomplete for most products, with significant variation across products. Unlike previous studies, he finds that most of the variation in pass-through is explained by the presence of multinational corporations and nontariff barriers. Copyright 1996 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Menon, Jayant, 1996. "The Degree and Determinants of Exchange Rate Pass-through: Market Structure, Non-tariff Barriers and Multinational Corporations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 434-444, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:106:y:1996:i:435:p:434-44

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brown, William & Walsh, Janet, 1991. "Pay Determination in Britain in the 1980s; the Anatomy of Decentralization," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 44-59, Spring.
    2. Clark, Simon, 1991. "Inventory Accumulation, Wages, and Employment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 230-238, March.
    3. Nickell, Stephen J, 1987. "Why Is Wage Inflation in Britain So High?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 49(1), pages 103-128, February.
    4. Ingram, Peter N, 1991. "Ten Years of Manufacturing Wage Settlements: 1979-89," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 93-106, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Athukorala, Premachandra & Menon, Jayant, 1994. "Pricing to Market Behaviour and Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Japanese Exports," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 271-281, March.
    2. Kenny, Geoff & McGettigan, Donal, 1996. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through and Irish Import Prices," Research Technical Papers 6/RT/96, Central Bank of Ireland.
    3. Mohamed Abdul Hafez Ghars El-Din & Yousuf Hasan Jawad Mohammad, 2001. "Exchange Rate and Domestic Prices in The GCC Countries," Working Papers 0105, Economic Research Forum, revised 02 Aug 2001.
    4. Janine Aron & Ronald Macdonald & John Muellbauer, 2014. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Developing and Emerging Markets: A Survey of Conceptual, Methodological and Policy Issues, and Selected Empirical Findings," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(1), pages 101-143, January.
    5. Atif Ali Jaffri, 2010. "Exchange Rate Pass-through to Consumer Prices in Pakistan: Does Misalignment Matter?," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 49(1), pages 19-35.
    6. Clostermann, Jörg, 1996. "The impact of the exchange rate on Germany's balance of trade," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 1996,07e, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    7. Mallick, Sushanta & Marques, Helena, 2012. "Pricing to market with trade liberalization: The role of market heterogeneity and product differentiation in India’s exports," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 310-336.
    8. Athukorala, Premachandra & Menon, Jayant, 1995. "Exchange Rates and Strategic Pricing: The Case of Swedish Machinery Exports," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(4), pages 533-546, November.
    9. repec:ris:betajl:0015 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Joseph P. Byrne & Aditya S. Chavali & Alexandros Kontonikas., 2010. "Exchange Rate Pass Through To Import Prices: Panel Evidence From Emerging Market Economies," Working Papers 2010_19, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    11. Sushanta Mallick & Helena Marques, 2008. "Passthrough of Exchange Rate and Tariffs into Import Prices of India: Currency Depreciation versus Import Liberalization," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 765-782, September.
    12. Andreas Benedictow & Pål Boug, 2013. "Trade liberalisation and exchange rate pass-through: the case of textiles and wearing apparels," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 757-788, October.
    13. barhoumi karim, 2005. "Long Run Exchange Rate Pass-Through Into Import Prices In Developing Countries: An Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Phenomenon?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(14), pages 1-12.
    14. Martins Bitans, 2004. "Pass-Through of Exchange Rates to Domestic Prices in East European Countries and the Role of Economic Enviroment," Working Papers 2004/04, Latvijas Banka.
    15. Menon, Jayant, 2009. "Managing Success in Viet Nam: Macroeconomic Consequences of Large Capital Inflows with Limited Policy Tools," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 27, Asian Development Bank.
    16. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:6:y:2005:i:14:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Zhi Yu, 2013. "Exchange rate pass-through, firm heterogeneity and product quality: a theoretical analysis," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 141, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    18. Kevin Nell, 2000. "Imported Inflation in South Africa: An Empirical Study," Studies in Economics 0005, School of Economics, University of Kent.

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