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The Distributional Impact of Price Changes in Hungary and the United Kingdom

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  • Newbery, David M

Abstract

In Soviet-type economies, commodity prices were distorted as part of the redistributive system of the state, but with the transition, prices have been liberalized and taxes made more uniform. Has this change adversely affected the distribution of purchasing power? This paper develops a new method of measuring the distributional impact of price changes by computing the distributional characteristics of commodities from household budget survey data and applies it to Hungary and the United Kingdom, finding that the distributional impacts over the past decade were negligible and not significantly different from zero in both cases. Copyright 1995 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Newbery, David M, 1995. "The Distributional Impact of Price Changes in Hungary and the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(431), pages 847-863, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:105:y:1995:i:431:p:847-63
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    Cited by:

    1. Eduardo Ley, 2005. "Whose inflation? A characterization of the CPI plutocratic gap," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(4), pages 634-646, October.
    2. François Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(1), pages 77-106, April.
    3. Alessandro Santoro, 2007. "Marginal Commodity Tax Reforms: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 827-848, September.
    4. Rinaldo Brau & Massimo Florio, 2004. "Privatisations as price reforms: Evaluating consumers' welfare changes in the U.K," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 75-76, pages 109-133.
    5. Flemming, J.S. & Micklewright, John, 2000. "Income distribution, economic systems and transition," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 843-918 Elsevier.
    6. Jason Loughrey & Cathal O’Donoghue, 2012. "The Welfare Impact of Price Changes on Household Welfare and Inequality 1999-2011," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(1), pages 31-66.
    7. Hancevic, Pedro & Cont, Walter & Navajas, Fernando, 2016. "Energy populism and household welfare," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 464-474.
    8. Cathal O'Donoghue & Massimo Baldini, 2004. "Modelling the Redistributive Impact of Indirect Taxes in Europe: An Application of EUROMOD," Working Papers 0077, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 2004.
    9. Carvalho, Diogo Baerlocher & Siqueira, Rozane Bezerra de & Nogueira, José Ricardo Bezerra, 2013. "Características Distributivas e Impacto de Reformas Tributárias Sobre o Bem-Estar das Famílias no Brasil," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 67(3), September.
    10. Paolo Liberati, 2001. "The Distributional Effects of Indirect Tax Changes in Italy," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 8(1), pages 27-51, January.
    11. repec:eee:enepol:v:110:y:2017:i:c:p:478-489 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Massimo Florio & Rinaldo Brau, 2001. "Privatisations as price reforms: an analysis of consumers' welfare change in the U.K," Departmental Working Papers 2001-19, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    13. Hancevic, Pedro I. & Nuñez, Hector M. & Rosellon, Juan, 2017. "Distributed photovoltaic power generation: Possibilities, benefits, and challenges for a widespread application in the Mexican residential sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 478-489.
    14. Araar, Abdelkrim, 2002. "L’impact des variations des prix sur les niveaux d’inégalité et de bien-être : une application à la Pologne durant la période de transition," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 78(2), pages 221-242, Juin.
    15. Georgia Kaplanoglou, 2004. "Household Consumption Patterns, Indirect Tax Structures and Implications for Indirect Tax Harmonisation - A Three Country Perspective," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 35(1), pages 83-107.
    16. Randall K. Filer & Jan Hanousek, 2002. "Data Watch: Research Data from Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 225-240, Winter.
    17. repec:fgv:epgrbe:v:67:n:3:a:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Toba, Natsuko, 2007. "Welfare impacts of electricity generation sector reform in the Philippines," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6145-6162, December.
    19. Stephen Pudney & Nikolay Markov & Robert Ackrill, "undated". "Indirect Tax Reform in Bulgaria," Discussion Papers in European Economics 99/3, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    20. Mohsin, Asma & Zaman, Khalid, 2012. "Distributional effects of rising food prices in Pakistan: Evidence from HIES 2001–02 and 2005–06 survey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 1986-1995.
    21. Mathew Adagunodo, 2013. "Petroleum Products Pricing Reform in Nigeria: Welfare Analysis from Household Budget Survey," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(4), pages 459-472.

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