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Why Are There So Many Long Term Sick in Britain?

Author

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  • Disney, Richard
  • Webb, Steven

Abstract

This paper examines the upward trend of numbers in receipt of Invalidity Benefit (the major contributory benefit for the long-term sick) in Britain since 1971. Possible explanations include the rising level of unemployment through much of the period; the heightened link between ill-health and early retirement; changes in the real level of benefits; and changes in the composition of the workforce. These possibilities are examined using a variety of methodologies: time-series, cross-section, and fixed-effects models. Copyright 1991 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Disney, Richard & Webb, Steven, 1991. "Why Are There So Many Long Term Sick in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 252-262, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:101:y:1991:i:405:p:252-62
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrén, Daniela, 2001. "Long-Term Absenteeism Due To Sickness: The Swedish Experience, 1986-1991," Working Papers in Economics 47, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. David Armstrong, 1999. "Hidden Male Unemployment in Northern Ireland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(6), pages 499-511.
    3. Richard Blundell & Amanda Gosling & Hidehiko Ichimura & Costas Meghir, 2007. "Changes in the Distribution of Male and Female Wages Accounting for Employment Composition Using Bounds," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(2), pages 323-363, March.
    4. R. G. Gregory, 2013. "The Henderson Question? The Melbourne Institute and fifty years of welfare policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 682, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    5. van Soest, A.H.O. & Fontein, P.F. & Euwals, R.W., 1996. "Earnings Capacity and Labour Market Participation," Discussion Paper 1996-57, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Arnau Juanmarti Mestres & Judit Vall Castelló, 2016. "Great Recession and disability insurance in Spain," Economics Working Papers 1519, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Apr 2017.
    7. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Arnau Juanmarti Mestres & Judit Vall-Castello, 2016. "Great Recession and Disability in Spain," Working Papers 896, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    8. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Carl Emmerson, 2015. "Disability Benefit Receipt and Reform: Reconciling Trends in the United Kingdom," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 173-190, Spring.
    9. James Banks & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from the United Kingdom," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 329-357 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Owen O'Donnell, 1998. "The Effect of Disability on Employment Allowing for Work Incapacity," Studies in Economics 9813, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    11. Musgrave, Ralph S., 2009. "Workfare: a marginal employment subsidy for public and private sectors (2nd edition)," MPRA Paper 14206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. William Collier, 2003. "The Impact of Demographic and Individual Heterogeneity on Unemployment Duration: A Regional Study," ERSA conference papers ersa03p496, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Richard Disney & Sergi Jiménez-Martín, 2010. "Disability, capacity for work and the business cycle: an international perspective," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 483-536, July.
    14. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3417-3528 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Zantomio, Francesca, 2013. "Older people's participation in extra-cost disability benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 320-330.
    16. Lixin Cai & Ha Vu & Roger Wilkins, 2007. "Disability Support Pension Recipients: Who Gets Off (and Stays Off) Payments?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 40(1), pages 37-61, March.
    17. Massimiliano Agovino & Giuliana Parodi, 2015. "Human Development and the Determinants of the Incidence of Civilian Disability Pensions in Italy: A Spatial Panel Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 553-576, June.
    18. Disney, Richard & Emmerson, Carl & Wakefield, Matthew, 2006. "Ill health and retirement in Britain: A panel data-based analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 621-649, July.
    19. Whittaker, W & Sutton, M, 2010. "Mental health, work incapacity and State transfers: an analysis of the British Household Panel Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    20. Tom Clark & Jayne Taylor, 1999. "Income inequality: a tale of two cycles?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 20(4), pages 387-408, December.
    21. Duncan McVicar, 2006. "Why do disability benefit rolls vary between regions? A review of the evidence from the USA and the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 519-533.
    22. Robert G. Gregory, 2013. "The Henderson Question? The Melbourne Institute and 50 Years of Welfare Policy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(2), pages 202-215, June.
    23. Andrén, Daniela, 2001. "Exits From Long-Term Sickness In Sweden," Working Papers in Economics 48, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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