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Ecuadorian Perceptions Towards US Foreign Policy: An Econometric Analysis


  • Rosenberg, M


The following paper investigates the aptitudes towards the US in Ecuador, a country critical to resolving the Colombian conflict, to fighting the drug trade, and to understanding how development aid can be best distributed. By incorporating an ad hoc database of Ecuadorians’ perceptions towards US foreign policy and Ecuadorian government policy, the study conclusively identifies the variables affecting views of the US, which include ignorance, the IMF, dollarization, remittances, US involvement in the Colombian conflict, and the drug policy. To assure the effectiveness of its foreign policy, the US policies should cultivate a stronger relationship with population demands by addressing the stated needs of the Ecuadorian population and focus on education, health and the fight against corruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosenberg, M, 2004. "Ecuadorian Perceptions Towards US Foreign Policy: An Econometric Analysis," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:4:y:2004:i:1_15

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean


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