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Do Portfolio Distortions Reflect Superior Information or Psychological Biases?

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  • Korniotis, George M.
  • Kumar, Alok

Abstract

Using a demographics-based proxy for smartness, we show that the portfolio distortions of “smart” investors reflect an informational advantage, while the distortions of “dumb” investors reflect psychological biases. Specifically, smart investors outperform dumb investors by about 3% annually on a risk-adjusted basis. Furthermore, among investors with high portfolio distortions, smart investors outperform passive benchmarks by 2%, and the smart-dumb performance differential is 5%. At the stock level, a portfolio of stocks with smart investor clientele outperforms the dumb clientele portfolio by 3.50% annually. These findings suggest that behavioral and information-based explanations for portfolio distortions apply to distinct subsets of investors.

Suggested Citation

  • Korniotis, George M. & Kumar, Alok, 2013. "Do Portfolio Distortions Reflect Superior Information or Psychological Biases?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(01), pages 1-45, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:48:y:2013:i:01:p:1-45_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Bekaert, Geert & Hoyem, Kenton & Hu, Wei-Yin & Ravina, Enrichetta, 2017. "Who is internationally diversified? Evidence from the 401(k) plans of 296 firms," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 86-112.
    2. Magron, Camille & Merli, Maxime, 2015. "Repurchase behavior of individual investors, sophistication and regret," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 15-26.
    3. Milo Bianchi, 2018. "Financial Literacy and Portfolio Dynamics," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 73(2), pages 831-859, April.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1309-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Geert Bekaert & Kenton Hoyem & Wei-Yin Hu & Enrichetta Ravina, 2015. "Who is Internationally Diversified? Evidence from 296 401(k)," NBER Working Papers 21236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Giofré, Maela, 2017. "Financial education, investor protection and international portfolio diversification," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 111-139.
    7. repec:bla:acctfi:v:57:y:2017:i:3:p:759-788 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Mason, Andrew & Agyei-Ampomah, Sam & Skinner, Frank, 2016. "Realism, skill, and incentives: Current and future trends in investment management and investment performance," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 31-40.
    9. Hoechle, Daniel & Schmid, Markus & Zimmermann, Heinz, 2017. "Correcting Alpha Misattribution In Portfolio Sorts," Working Papers on Finance 1717, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance, revised Jun 2018.
    10. Kiss, H.J. & Rodriguez-Lara, I. & Rosa-García, A., 2016. "Think twice before running! Bank runs and cognitive abilities," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 12-19.
    11. Agarwal, Sumit & Ben-David, Itzhak & Yao, Vincent, 2017. "Systematic mistakes in the mortgage market and lack of financial sophistication," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 42-58.
    12. Baschieri, Giulia & Carosi, Andrea & Mengoli, Stefano, 2016. "Does the earnings quality matter? Evidence from a quasi-experimental setting," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 146-157.
    13. Bonsang, Eric & Dohmen, Thomas, 2015. "Risk attitude and cognitive aging," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 112-126.
    14. Barber, Brad M. & Lee, Yi-Tsung & Liu, Yu-Jane & Odean, Terrance, 2014. "The cross-section of speculator skill: Evidence from day trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 1-24.
    15. Kiss, Hubert János & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Rosa-García, Alfonso, 2015. "Kognitív képességek és stratégiai bizonytalanság egy bankrohamkísérletben
      [Cognitive abilities and strategic uncertainty in a bank-run experiment]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(10), pages 1030-1047.
    16. Jame, Russell & Tong, Qing, 2014. "Industry-based style investing," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 110-130.

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