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How Do Analyst Recommendations Respond to Major News?


  • Conrad, Jennifer
  • Cornell, Bradford
  • Landsman, Wayne R.
  • Rountree, Brian R.


We examine how analysts respond to public information when setting stock recommendations. We model the determinants of analysts' recommendation changes following large stock price movements. We find evidence of an asymmetry following large positive and negative returns. Following large stock price increases, analysts are equally likely to upgrade or downgrade. Following large stock price declines, analysts are more likely to downgrade. This asymmetry exists after accounting for investment banking relationships and herding behavior. This result suggests recommendation changes are “sticky” in one direction, with analysts reluctant to downgrade. Moreover, this result implies that analysts' optimistic bias may vary through time.

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  • Conrad, Jennifer & Cornell, Bradford & Landsman, Wayne R. & Rountree, Brian R., 2006. "How Do Analyst Recommendations Respond to Major News?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(01), pages 25-49, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:41:y:2006:i:01:p:25-49_00

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Minna Yu, 2011. "Analyst recommendations and corporate governance in emerging markets," International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(1), pages 34-52, March.
    2. Phillip J. McKnight & Steven K. Todd, 2013. "Forecast Bias and Analyst Independence," International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), vol. 0(2), pages 3-32.
    3. AltInkIlIç, Oya & Hansen, Robert S., 2009. "On the information role of stock recommendation revisions," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 17-36, October.
    4. Marco Aiolfi & Marius Rodriguez & Allan Timmermann, 2010. "Understanding Analysts' Earnings Expectations: Biases, Nonlinearities, and Predictability," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 8(3), pages 305-334, Summer.
    5. Anolli, Mario & Beccalli, Elena & Molyneux, Philip, 2014. "Bank earnings forecasts, risk and the crisis," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 309-335.
    6. Sheridan Titman & Takahiro Azuma & Katsuhiko Okada & Yukinobu Hamuro, 2014. "Is No News Good News?: The Streaming News Effect on Investor Behavior Surrounding Analyst Stock Revision Announcement," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 29-51, March.
    7. repec:bla:stratm:v:38:y:2017:i:13:p:2599-2622 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Ramnath, Sundaresh & Rock, Steve & Shane, Philip, 2008. "The financial analyst forecasting literature: A taxonomy with suggestions for further research," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 34-75.
    9. April Knill & Kristina Minnick & Ali Nejadmalayeri, 2012. "Experience, information asymmetry, and rational forecast bias," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 241-272, August.
    10. Jiang, George J. & Zhu, Kevin X., 2017. "Information Shocks and Short-Term Market Underreaction," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 43-64.
    11. Hobbs, Jeffrey & Singh, Vivek, 2015. "A comparison of buy-side and sell-side analysts," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 42-51.
    12. Thabang Mokoaleli-Mokoteli & Richard J. Taffler & Vineet Agarwal, 2009. "Behavioural Bias and Conflicts of Interest in Analyst Stock Recommendations," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(3-4), pages 384-418.
    13. Jan Klobucnik & Daniel Kreutzmann & Soenke Sievers & Stefan Kanne, 2012. "To buy or not to buy? The value of contradictory analyst signals," Cologne Graduate School Working Paper Series 03-03, Cologne Graduate School in Management, Economics and Social Sciences.
    14. Huang, Haozhi & Li, Mingsheng & Shi, Jing, 2016. "Which matters: “Paying to play” or stable business relationship? Evidence on analyst recommendation and mutual fund commission fee payment," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 403-423.
    15. Jung, Jay Heon & Pae, Jinhan & Yoo, Choong-Yuel, 2015. "Do analysts treat winners and losers differently when forecasting earnings?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 531-549.

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