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The Effects of Reverse Splits on the Liquidity of the Stock

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  • Han, Ki C.

Abstract

This study investigates the liquidity effects of reverse stock splits using bid-ask spread, trading volume, and the number of nontrading days as proxies for the liquidity of the stock. Results indicate a decrease in bid-ask spread and an increase in trading volume after reverse splits. More importantly, the number of nontrading days significantly declines following reverse splits. For the control group, however, no such changes are observed. These results suggest that reverse splits enhance the liquidity of the stock.

Suggested Citation

  • Han, Ki C., 1995. "The Effects of Reverse Splits on the Liquidity of the Stock," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 159-169, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:30:y:1995:i:01:p:159-169_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Jae-Kwang Hwang & Young Dimkpah & Alex Ogwu, 2012. "Do Reverse Stock Splits Benefit Long-term Shareholders?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 18(4), pages 439-449, November.
    2. Muscarella, Chris J. & Vetsuypens, Michael R., 1996. "Stock splits: Signaling or liquidity? The case of ADR 'solo-splits'," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 3-26, September.
    3. Ravi Dhar & William Goetzmann & Ning Zhu & EFA Moscow, 2004. "The Impact of Clientele Changes: Evidence from Stock Splits," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm369, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Sep 2009.
    4. Claire Crutchley & Steven Swidler, 2015. "Multiple reverse stock splits (investors beware!)," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(2), pages 357-369, April.
    5. Cahit Adaoglu & Meziane Lasfer, 2011. "Why Do Companies Pay Stock Dividends? The Case of Bonus Distributions in an Inflationary Environment," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(5-6), pages 601-627, June.
    6. Bechmann, Ken L. & Raaballe, Johannes, 2004. "The Differences Between Stock Splits and Stock Dividends," Working Papers 2004-1, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Finance.
    7. Himmelmann, Achim & Schiereck, Dirk, 2012. "Drug approval decisions: A note on stock liquidity effects," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 640-652.
    8. Kee H. Chung & Sean Yang, 2015. "Reverse Stock Splits, Institutional Holdings, and Share Value," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 44(1), pages 177-216, March.
    9. Malhotra, Madhuri Malhotra & M., Thenmozhi & Gopalaswamy, Arun Kumar, 2012. "Liquidity changes around bonus and rights issue announcements: Evidence from manufacturing and service sectors in India," MPRA Paper 41216, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Rhee, S. Ghon & Wu, Feng, 2012. "Anything wrong with breaking a buck? An empirical evaluation of NASDAQ's $1 minimum bid price maintenance criterion," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 258-285.
    11. repec:kap:iaecre:v:18:y:2012:i:4:p:439-449 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Neuhauser, Karyn L. & Thompson, Thomas H., 2016. "Survivability following reverse stock splits: What determines the fate of non-surviving firms?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 1-22.
    13. Ahern, Kenneth R., 2009. "Sample selection and event study estimation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 466-482, June.

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