IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cup/jechis/v31y1971i04p777-803_07.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Rise and Fall of the Manorial System: A Theoretical Model

Author

Listed:
  • North, Douglass C.
  • Thomas, Robert Paul

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • North, Douglass C. & Thomas, Robert Paul, 1971. "The Rise and Fall of the Manorial System: A Theoretical Model," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(04), pages 777-803, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:31:y:1971:i:04:p:777-803_07
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022050700074623
    File Function: link to article abstract page
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. James Fenske, 2013. "Does Land Abundance Explain African Institutions?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(12), pages 1363-1390, December.
    2. Robert W. Fogel, 2008. "The Impact of the Asian Miracle on the Theory of Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, pages 311-354 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Shixiong Cao, 2015. "Political Ecology of Nation-States with Examples from Chinese History," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 445-462, November.
    4. Alexander Klein & Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2017. "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor Endowments in Bohemia," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 344, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    5. Nils-Petter Lagerlof, 2002. "The Roads To and From Serfdom," Macroeconomics 0212011, EconWPA.
    6. Yang, He, 2014. "The impact of intensive farming on land tenure: Evidence from Confucius' manors (1759–1901)," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 279-289.
    7. Heibø Modalsli, Jørgen, 2011. "Solow meets Marx: Economic growth and the emergence of social class," Memorandum 21/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    8. Du, Jane & Deng, Kent, 2016. "To get the prices right for food: a “Gerschenkron state” versus the market in reforming China, 1979–2006," Economic History Working Papers 65369, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    9. Sedlarski, Teodor, 2014. "Социалнопсихологически Аспекти На Пазарната Размяна В Институционалната Икономика
      [Socio-Psychological Aspects Of Market Exchange In Institutional Economics]
      ," MPRA Paper 54246, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. John Hartwick, 2006. "The Control of Land Rent in the Fortified Farming Town," Working Papers 1096, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    11. Volckart, Oliver, 2000. "The open constitution and its enemies: competition, rent seeking, and the rise of the modern state," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 1-17, May.
    12. Fenske, James, 2010. "Institutions in African history and development: A review essay," MPRA Paper 23120, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Gérard Grellet & Naîma Grellet, 1999. "Développement des marchés et coûts de transaction. Une critique des politiques économiques libérales," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 40(157), pages 37-49.
    14. Ghosh, Suman & Karaivanov, Alexander, 2007. "Can a raise in your wage make you worse off? A public goods perspective," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 551-571, September.
    15. Daniel W. Bromley, 1997. "Constitutional Political Economy: Property Claims In A Dynamic World," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(4), pages 43-54, October.
    16. F. Frederic Deng, 2002. "Ground Lease-Based Land Use System versus Common Interest Development," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(2), pages 190-206.
    17. James Fenske, 2012. "Land abundance and economic institutions: Egba land and slavery, 1830–1914," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(2), pages 527-555, May.
    18. Teodor Sedlarski, 2014. "Socio-psychological aspects of market exchange in institutional economy," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 1, pages 95-114.
    19. Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2007. "'Whatever Is, Is Right'?, Economic Institutions in Pre-Industrial Europe (Tawney Lecture 2006)," CESifo Working Paper Series 2066, CESifo Group Munich.
    20. Pies, Ingo, 2008. "Theoretische Grundlagen demokratischer Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftspolitik: Der Ansatz von Douglass North," Discussion Papers 2008-8, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Chair of Economic Ethics.
    21. Benito Arruñada, 2000. "The role of institutions in the contractual process," Economics Working Papers 521, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Apr 2003.
    22. Ogilvie, Sheilagh & Carus, A.W., 2014. "Institutions and Economic Growth in Historical Perspective," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 8, pages 403-513 Elsevier.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:31:y:1971:i:04:p:777-803_07. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Keith Waters). General contact details of provider: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_JEH .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.