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The Origin of the Architecture of the Solar System


  • Perryman, Michael


This article relates two topics of central importance in modern astronomy – the discovery some 15 years ago of the first planets around other stars (referred to as exoplanets), and the centuries-old problem of understanding the origin of our own solar system, with its planets, planetary satellites, asteroids, and comets. The surprising diversity of exoplanets, of which more than 500 have already been discovered, has required new models to explain their formation and evolution. In turn, these models explain, rather naturally, a number of important features of our own solar system, amongst them the masses and orbits of the ‘terrestrial’ and ‘gas giant’ planets, the presence and distribution of asteroids and comets, the origin and impact cratering of the Moon, and the existence of water on Earth.

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  • Perryman, Michael, 2012. "The Origin of the Architecture of the Solar System," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(02), pages 276-290, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:eurrev:v:20:y:2012:i:02:p:276-290_00

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Reyerson, Kathryn, 2006. "Institutions and the Path to the Modern Economy: Lessons from Medieval Trade. By Avner Greif. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Pp. xix, 503. $34.99, paper," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(04), pages 1080-1081, December.
    2. Azim Raimbaev, 2011. "The case of transition economies: what institutions matter for growth?," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 54(2), pages 1-33.
    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:98:y:2004:i:04:p:633-652_04 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kingston, Christopher & Caballero, Gonzalo, 2009. "Comparing theories of institutional change," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 151-180, August.
    5. Azim Raimbaev, 2011. "The case of transition economies: what institutions matter for growth?," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2011_16, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    6. Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 2008. "Religion, politics, and development: Lessons from the lands of Islam," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 329-351, November.
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