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Agricultural expansion, forest products as safety nets, and deforestation

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  • DELACOTE, PHILIPPE

Abstract

This paper aims to address the impact on deforestation of the use of forest products as safety nets by poor agricultural households. Two safety-net uses may be implemented: the diversification strategy and the coping strategy. With both strategies, crop risk reduction, lower risk aversion and larger population increase tropical deforestation. Forest profitability always tends to increase the forest cover in the diversification case. Conversely, considering the coping strategy, two opposite effects determine the impact of forest profitability on the forest cover: a portfolio effect and an insurance effect. Finally, the household is better off and deforests less when using the diversification strategy instead of the coping strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Delacote, Philippe, 2007. "Agricultural expansion, forest products as safety nets, and deforestation," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 235-249, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:12:y:2007:i:02:p:235-249_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch & Edwin Muchapondwah, 2013. "Do the Poor Benefit from Devolution Policies? Evidences from Quantile Treatment Effect Evaluation of Joint Forest Management," Working Papers 201388, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Andersson, Camilla & Mekonnen, Alemu & Stage, Jesper, 2011. "Impacts of the Productive Safety Net Program in Ethiopia on livestock and tree holdings of rural households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 119-126, January.
    3. Mujawamariya, Gaudiose & Karimov, Aziz A., 2014. "Importance of socio-economic factors in the collection of NTFPs: The case of gum arabic in Kenya," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 24-29.
    4. Yoshito Takasaki & Bradford L. Barham & Oliver T. Coomes, 2010. "Smoothing Income against Crop Flood Losses in Amazonia: Rain Forest or Rivers as a Safety Net?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 48-63, February.
    5. Manning, Dale T. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2015. "Agricultural Efficiency and Labor Supply to Common Property Resource Collection: Lessons from Rural Mexico," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(3), pages 1-22, September.
    6. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "Economic models of shifting cultivation: a review," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2011-006, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    7. Gelo, Dambala, 2020. "Forest commons, vertical integration and smallholder’s saving and investment responses: Evidence from a quasi-experiment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 132(C).
    8. Albers, H.J. & Robinson, E.J.Z., 2013. "A review of the spatial economics of non-timber forest product extraction: Implications for policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 87-95.
    9. Nielsen, Martin Reinhardt & Pouliot, Mariève & Kim Bakkegaard, Riyong, 2012. "Combining income and assets measures to include the transitory nature of poverty in assessments of forest dependence: Evidence from the Democratic Republic of Congo," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 37-46.
    10. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch, 2012. "Welfare and Common Property Rights Forestry: Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," Working Papers 277, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    11. Combes, Jean-Louis & Delacote, Philippe & Combes Motel, Pascale & Yogo, Thierry Urbain, 2018. "Public spending, credit and natural capital: Does access to capital foster deforestation?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 306-316.
    12. Gelo, Dambala & Dikgang, Johane, 2019. "Collective action and heterogeneous welfare effects: Evidence from Ethiopian villages," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 16(C).
    13. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch, 2011. "The Welfare Effect of Common Property Forestry Rights:Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," Working Papers 201123, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    14. Yoshito Takasaki & Oliver T. Coomes & Christian Abizaid & Stéphanie Brisson, 2014. "An Efficient Nonmarket Institution under Imperfect Markets: Labor Sharing for Tropical Forest Clearing," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(3), pages 711-732.
    15. Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Jean-Louis COMBES & Catherine ARAUJO BONJEAN & Claudio ARAUJO & Eustaquio J. REIS, 2010. "Does Land Tenure Insecurity Drive Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon?," Working Papers 201013, CERDI.
    16. Gelo, Dambala & Muchapondwa, Edwin & Koch, Steven F., 2016. "Decentralization, market integration and efficiency-equity trade-offs: Evidence from Joint Forest Management in Ethiopian villages," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 1-23.
    17. Takasaki, Yoshito, 2011. "Do the Commons Help Augment Mutual Insurance Among the Poor?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 429-438, March.

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