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Families, Time, and Well-Being in Canada

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  • Peter Burton
  • Shelley Phipps

Abstract

We study changes in time and money available to families with children from 1971 to 2006. Increases in incomes at the top of the Canadian income distribution since the mid-1990s have taken place without any significant increases in total family hours of paid work. On the other hand, for families in the middle of the income distribution, family income has stagnated, despite the fact that parents jointly supply significantly higher hours of paid work. If both time and money are valuable resources for the production of well-being for family members, these findings suggest that inequality in well-being has increased even more than inequality of income.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Burton & Shelley Phipps, 2011. "Families, Time, and Well-Being in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 37(3), pages 395-423, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:37:y:2011:i:3:p:395-423
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cpp.37.3.395
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-484, July.
    2. Christopher P. Barrington-Leigh & John F. Helliwell, 2008. "Empathy and Emulation: Life Satisfaction and the Urban Geography of Comparison Groups," NBER Working Papers 14593, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Anderson, Patricia M. & Butcher, Kristin F. & Levine, Phillip B., 2003. "Maternal employment and overweight children," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 477-504, May.
    4. Erzo F. P. Luttmer, 2005. "Neighbors as Negatives: Relative Earnings and Well-Being," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(3), pages 963-1002.
    5. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton & Lars Osberg, 2001. "Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for Themselves than Wives?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 1-21.
    6. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2005. "Income and well-being: an empirical analysis of the comparison income effect," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 997-1019, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Burton & Shelley Phipps, 2017. "The Economic Well-Being of Canadian Children," LIS Working papers 704, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Dora G. Gudmundsdóttir & Bryndís Björk Ásgeirsdóttir & Felicia A. Huppert & Inga D. Sigfúsdóttir & Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir & Arna Hauksdóttir, 2016. "How Does the Economic Crisis Influence Adolescents’ Happiness? Population-Based Surveys in Iceland in 2000–2010," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 1219-1234, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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