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The impact of patent rights on international trade: evidence from Canada

Author

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  • Mohammed Rafiquzzaman

Abstract

The extent to which Canadian manufacturing exports are sensitive to national differences in patent rights are examined. The conclusion is that, overall, Canadians tend to export more to those countries where their patent rights are highly safeguarded. Stronger patent protection induces Canadians to export relatively more to high-income countries than to low-income countries. In addition, the effect of stronger patent rights is to increase exports to those countries that pose a strong threat of imitation and to reduce exports to those countries that pose the weakest threat of imitation.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammed Rafiquzzaman, 2002. "The impact of patent rights on international trade: evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(2), pages 307-330, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:35:y:2002:i:2:p:307-330
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Felix Groba & Jing Cao, 2015. "Chinese Renewable Energy Technology Exports: The Role of Policy, Innovation and Markets," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 60(2), pages 243-283, February.
    2. Fukui, E. Tani & Hammer, Alexander B. & Jones, Lin Z., 2013. "Are U.S. exports influenced by stronger IPR protection measures in recipient markets?," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 179-188.
    3. Palangkaraya, Alfons & Jensen, Paul H. & Webster, Elizabeth, 2017. "The effect of patents on trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 1-9.
    4. Mercedes Delgado & Margaret Kyle & Anita M. McGahan, 2013. "Intellectual Property Protection and the Geography of Trade," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 733-762, September.
    5. Apurva Dey & Arun Kaushik & Rupayan Pal, 2017. "Probabilistic Patents, Alternative Damage Rules and Optimal Trade Policy," Working Papers id:11748, eSocialSciences.
    6. Nagano, Mamoru, 2013. "Similarities and differences among cross-border M&A and greenfield FDI determinants: Evidence from Asia and Oceania," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 100-118.
    7. Wonkyu Shin & Keun Lee & Walter G. Park, 2016. "When an Importer's Protection of IPR Interacts with an Exporter's Level of Technology: Comparing the Impacts on the Exports of the North and South," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(6), pages 772-802, June.
    8. Fragiskos Archontakis & Nikos Varsakelis, 2011. "US patents abroad: Does gravity matter?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 404-416, August.
    9. Olena Ivus & Walter Park & Kamal Saggi, 2015. "Patent Protection and the Industrial Composition of Multinational Activity: Evidence from U.S. Multinational Firms," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 15-00014, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    10. Wen-Hsien Liu & Hui-Fang Liang, 2016. "Will Domestic Imitative Threats Influence High-Tech Imports? Evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 12(1), pages 37-60, February.
    11. Hsu, Judy & Tiao, Yu-En, 2015. "Patent rights protection and foreign direct investment in Asian countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-6.
    12. Rod Falvey & Neil Foster & David Greenaway, 2009. "Trade, imitative ability and intellectual property rights," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 145(3), pages 373-404, October.
    13. Awokuse, Titus O. & Yin, Hong, 2010. "Does Stronger Intellectual Property Rights Protection Induce More Bilateral Trade? Evidence from China's Imports," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1094-1104, August.
    14. Archontakis, Fragiskos & Varsakelis, Nikos C., 2017. "Patenting abroad: Evidence from OECD countries," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 62-69.
    15. Kirkpatrick, Colin & Raihan, Selim & Bleser, Adam & Prud'homme, Dan & Mayrand, Karel & Morin, Jean Frederic & Pollitt, Hector & Hinojosa, Leonith & Williams, Michael, 2011. "Trade sustainability impact assessment (SIA) on the comprehensive economic and trade agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada: Final report," MPRA Paper 28812, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Yungho Weng & Chih-Hai Yang & Yi-Ju Huang, 2009. "Intellectual property rights and U.S. information goods exports: the role of imitation threat," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(2), pages 109-134, May.
    17. Chih-Hai Yang & Yi-Ju Huang, 2009. "Do Intellectual Property Rights Matter To Taiwan'S Exports? A Dynamic Panel Approach," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(4), pages 555-578, October.
    18. Ivus, Olena, 2010. "Do stronger patent rights raise high-tech exports to the developing world?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 38-47, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

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