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Políticas de medio ambiente y participación ciudadana


  • Mercedes Martínez Iglesias

    () (Universitat de València)

  • Ignacio Lerma Montero

    () (Universitat de València)

  • Ernest Garcia

    () (Universitat de València)


Citizen participation is often presented as a necessary part of the process of defining and managing environmental policies. In fact, it is generally regulated in a variety of ways that affect people’s rights to enquire, request and receive information. This article examines three aspects of this issue within the context of Spain: the legal and political limits of citizen participation rights, showing their inferior position in relation to conventional political participation; specific examples of citizen involvement in environmental conflicts, which operates by means that are often outside the regulated channels; and the social functions of requests for regulated participation, which indicate a remarkably contradictory situation. In actual fact, this participation takes very different forms, sometimes going through the channels defined by governments, though often consciously ignoring or questioning them. To ensure a sufficiently comprehensive analytical approach, it should include a sociological view of the conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Mercedes Martínez Iglesias & Ignacio Lerma Montero & Ernest Garcia, 2008. "Políticas de medio ambiente y participación ciudadana," CIRIEC-España, revista de economía pública, social y cooperativa, CIRIEC-España, issue 61, pages 179-201, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cic:revcir:y:2008:i:61:p:179-201

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rees, William E., 2006. "Globalization, trade and migration: Undermining sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 220-225, September.
    2. de Groot, Rudolf S. & Wilson, Matthew A. & Boumans, Roelof M. J., 2002. "A typology for the classification, description and valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 393-408, June.
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    4. Kaufmann, Robert K., 1995. "The economic multiplier of environmental life support: Can capital substitute for a degraded environment?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 67-79, January.
    5. Toman, Michael, 1998. "Sustainable Decisionmaking: The State of the Art from an Economics Perspective," Discussion Papers dp-98-39, Resources For the Future.
    6. Karp, Larry, 2005. "Global warming and hyperbolic discounting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2-3), pages 261-282, February.
    7. Boyce, James K., 1994. "Inequality as a cause of environmental degradation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 169-178, December.
    8. Solow, Robert M, 1986. " On the Intergenerational Allocation of Natural Resources," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 141-149.
    9. James Boyce, 1994. "Inequality as a Cause of Environmental Degradation," Published Studies ps1, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    10. Ekins, Paul & Simon, Sandrine & Deutsch, Lisa & Folke, Carl & De Groot, Rudolf, 2003. "A framework for the practical application of the concepts of critical natural capital and strong sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2-3), pages 165-185, March.
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    More about this item


    Citizen participation; environmental policies; ecological sociology; socio-ecological conflicts.;

    JEL classification:

    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy


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