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Student Feedback on Distance Learning with the Use of WebCT


  • Alina M. Zapalska

    () (Lewis College of Business, Marshall University)

  • Magdalena Niewiadomska Bugaj

    (Western Michigan University)

  • Frank Flanegin

    (Robert Morris University)

  • Denis Rudd

    (Robert Morris University)


This paper argues that pedagogical improvement can be successfully achieved by using technology. The use of WebCT-based instruction in an Economics undergraduate distance-learning programme is one vivid demonstration of the potential for using technology in instruction. Here, a satellite Economics course is taught using the WebCT as a complementary teaching instrument. This paper shows that using WebCT strongly contributed to the effectiveness of distance learning by improving the quality of students' comprehension in areas of critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making ability, aptitude for detail, written communication, knowledge of information, and ability to organise and analyse.

Suggested Citation

  • Alina M. Zapalska & Magdalena Niewiadomska Bugaj & Frank Flanegin & Denis Rudd, 2004. "Student Feedback on Distance Learning with the Use of WebCT," Computers in Higher Education Economics Review, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 16(1), pages 10-14.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:chepap:v:16:y:2004:i:1:p:10-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael P. Murray, 1999. "Econometrics Lectures in a Computer Classroom," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 308-321, January.
    2. O. Homer Erekson & Prosper Raynold & Michael K. Salemi, 1996. "Pedagogical Issues in Teaching Macroeconomics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(2), pages 100-107, April.
    3. Peter E. Kennedy, 2001. "Bootstrapping Student Understanding of What is Going on in Econometrics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 110-123, January.
    4. John J. Siegfried & Michael K. Salemi, 1999. "The State of Economic Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 355-361, May.
    5. W. Lee Hansen & Michael K. Salemi & John J. Siegfried, 2002. "Use It or Lose It: Teaching Literacy in the Economics Principles Course," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 463-472, May.
    6. Solow,Robert M., 1998. "Monopolistic Competition and Macroeconomic Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521626163, March.
    7. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    8. Frank Hahn & Robert Solow, 1997. "A Critical Essay on Modern Macroeconomic Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026258154x, July.
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