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Innovation 3.0: embedding into community knowledge - collaborative organizational learning beyond open innovation


  • Joachim Hafkesbrink
  • Markus Schroll


The paper describes a conceptual approach for a next-generation innovation paradigm in the Digital Economy called “Embedded Innovation” (Innovation 3.0). The notion of “embeddedness” is introduced to mark the increasing challenge of integrating firms into their surrounding communities to assure the absorption of exploitable knowledge. In the paper the evolutionary steps from Closed via Open to Embedded Innovation in small and medium sized companies (SME) are described. On the basis of the firm’s different relationships and knowledge flows with respect to its surrounding communities different modes of how and what to learn from communities are defined and how this may unfold leverage effects for the innovation process. Finally, we present empirical innovation case studies on how to embed the firm into communities with the aim of ensuring knowledge absorption and collaborative learning. JEL Codes: L17, O31, O32, O33

Suggested Citation

  • Joachim Hafkesbrink & Markus Schroll, 2011. "Innovation 3.0: embedding into community knowledge - collaborative organizational learning beyond open innovation," Journal of Innovation Economics, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 55-92.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:jiedbu:jie_007_0055

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    innovation 3.0; communities; collaborative learning; open innovation; embeddedness; organizational change; digital economy;

    JEL classification:

    • L17 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Open Source Products and Markets
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes


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