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Un profil de l'abandon scolaire au Cameroun

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  • Issidor Noumba

Abstract

This article presents a profile of school drop-out in Cameroon at the level of General Secondary Education. It rests on an expanded production function version to estimate a logistic model of the determinants of school drop-out, taking into account the marginal effects of explaining variables. The analysis of descriptive statistics and econometric estimations on data obtained from the Ministry of the Economy and Finance in 2004, in order to track public expenditure (the public expenditure tracking survey, PETS), led to the following findings : i) The drop-out rate from government schools is higher than that from private schools ; ii) the drop-out rate is higher in rural areas than in urban areas ; iii) there is not a significant difference between boys and girls as concerns dropping out of school ; iv) the family background and individual characteristics of the learner (namely, age) appear to be the main significant determinants of school drop-out.

Suggested Citation

  • Issidor Noumba, 2008. "Un profil de l'abandon scolaire au Cameroun," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 16(1), pages 37-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:edddbu:edd_221_0037
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    References listed on IDEAS

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